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How To Grow and Care for Gerbera Daisy -#1 Tips

Gerbera Daisy is just the vibrant addition every plant collector needs in their garden.

They get 3-4 inch flowers according to the University of Florida and are available in colors from white to pink.

But how to grow and care for Gerbera Daisy? This article will cover all the aspects how I care for my Gerbera Daisies from the right soil to how to prevent the most common pests.

Characterized by large flowering heads that mimic those of sunflowers,

these beautiful plants will fill up your living space with bright colors of pink, white, yellow, and red.

These vibrant gerbera daisies are the ideal way to brighten someone’s day!

Like sunflowers, it belongs to the Aster family.

Gerbera daisies are native to South Africa, and in the current day, they are usually grown utilizing hybridization.

Gerbera daisies are generally sold as starts which can be directly placed outdoors.

Alternatively, you can also grow your gerbera from seed indoors. However, this option is only feasible for warmer climates.

These plants are ideally planted in spring when all potential threats of frost have passed, and the seeds can be sowed both in a container or garden bed.

Having a moderate growth rate, they usually bloom in 14 to 18 weeks and continue to grow flowers for the rest of the summer season.

The flower heads feature large, ray-like petals skirting a tiny center of black or green flowers, with lobed or pinnate leaves which are often toothed.

Gerbera daisies typically have flowers of four different classes: single, semi-double, double, and spider.

Their number and type of petals define the classes. You can harvest the flowers once the center appears tight.

Make sure to keep the stems in 1-inch water, so the flowers last longer. Too much water can shorten their life.

 

How To Grow and Care for Gerbera Daisy

Gerbera Daisy thrives in adequately moist, well-drained soil rich in minerals. While the plant can tolerate low temperatures, it is ideal to grow them at temperatures ranging from 70 to 75 Fahrenheit (21 to 23 degrees Celsius). Gerberas enjoy ample sunlight and afternoon shade, so be sure to place the plant in a location with excellent sunlight exposure. Avoid overwatering the plant by only watering it when the soil appears dry.

How To Grow and Care for Gerbera Daisy

How To Grow and Care for Gerbera Daisy

 

 

Gerbera Daisy Growing Guide

 

Soil

Plant your daisy in rich soil that is well-drained and composed of organic matter.

Gerbera daisies grow well in pH-controlled soil, with pH ideally between 5.5 and 6.5.

Alkaline soil can severely damage the plant, causing chlorosis, manifesting as thin yellow lines on the leaves.

Similarly, acidic soil can facilitate the development of black spots or widespread patches on the leaves.

Plant your daisy in rich soil that is well-drained and composed of organic matter

Plant your daisy in rich soil that is well-drained and composed of organic matter

 

Water

Typically, gerbera daisies require watering on a routine basis.

Be careful to water only when the soil seems dry 1-2 inches beneath the top layer.

You might have to water your plant in hot seasons more often than usual.

Gerbera daisies need to be watered more frequently during the early stages of growth as they acclimate to the new landscape.

Make sure not to overwater your plant during winter.

In the colder seasons, daisies go dormant and only require seldom, light watering once or twice a month.

Gerbera daisies require watering on a routine basis when the soil appears visibly dry

Gerbera daisies require watering on a routine basis when the soil appears visibly dry

 

Light

Gerbera daisies thrive well in ample sunlight. Place them where they will get direct morning sunshine and afternoon shade.

At the same time, ensure that your plant is not constantly exposed to sunlight throughout the day, as it can cause leaves to scorch.

If you live in a region where the climate is particularly hot, place your plant in an area where it can get sufficient shade.

Intense sunlight exposure can be detrimental to the plant’s growth. Allow your plant to receive sufficient shade during the midday hours.

If you’re going to grow your gerbera daisy inside, make sure it’s near a window. In this way, it can receive adequate sunlight.

Pro tip: try to avoid growing your plant near structures (e.g., stone walls) that reflect light onto the plant, causing it to be further overwhelmed with heat.

Place them in a location where they can receive direct morning sunlight and afternoon shade

Place Gerbera daisies in a location where they can receive direct morning sunlight and afternoon shade

 

Temperature

Gerbera daisies grow well in temperatures between 70 to 75 Fahrenheit (21 to 23 degrees Celsius).

However, since these plants are frost-tender perennials, they can survive in temperatures as low as 30 Fahrenheit (-1 degrees Celsius).

Any frost formation on the stem and leaves can prove to be fatal.

Temperatures ideal for their growth is between 40 and 70 Fahrenheit (-4 to 21 degrees Celsius).

 

Humidity

The gerbera daisy has no specific humidity needs.

As long as you are not growing your plant in absolutely arid conditions, you are good to go.

 

Fertilizer

The fertilizer needs of your plant are directly reliant on the quality of your potting mix.

You may need to fertilize your soil regularly if it is mineral-rich.

A water-soluble fertilizer should be applied to the soil once a month as a general rule.

This will adequately nourish your plant, encourage healthy growth, and enable it to bloom throughout summer.

If you do not wish to use fertilizer, you could alternatively add organic compost around the plant’s roots once every month.

the rule of thumb is to fertilize the soil with a water-soluble fertilizer once a month

Gerbera daisy’s rule of thumb is to fertilize the soil with a water-soluble fertilizer once a month

 

Repotting

If you are looking to repot your gerbera daisy plant, start with choosing a pot that is slightly larger than your current one.

Also, make sure the pot has a drainage hole. Fill the pot with soil up to three inches tall.

Keep in mind that Gerberas prefer soil that is rich and well-drained.

Hold your daisy plant gently, with your palm against the topsoil and one hand around the daisy stem, and turn the pot upside down.

Wipe off any excess soil in the root area.

If you spot any dead or rotten roots, remove them gently (without damaging the healthy roots) with a pocket knife.

Place the plant in the new pot, and add/remove soil accordingly.

Make sure that the gerbera plant sits an inch lower than the height of the pot.

Add the potting mix in places with any empty spots.

Finally, slowly water the gerbera plant until you start seeing droplets leak from the bottom of the pot.

Repot your Gerbera Daisy plant

Repot your Gerbera Daisy plant

 

Propagation

Seeds are one of the simplest methods to grow your gerbera daisy plant.

It is ideal for sowing your seeds 12 to 18 weeks from the last frost in your region.

It is advised not to transplant premature seedlings; hence, start with growing your plant directly in a peat pot.

Gently press the seeds into the soil, just enough to be beneath the top layer. Gerbera seeds need light to sprout, so don’t press them too far down.

Enclose your pot in a thin plastic wrap or lid to ensure that both soil and seed remain adequately moist at all times.

Place your pot in a warm, sunny location, with temperatures ranging from 70 to 75 Fahrenheit (21 to 23 degrees Celsius).

 You’ll have to wait for 2 to 4 weeks for the seed to sprout. During the germination period, make sure to keep your pot indoors, near a window.

Once the seed has germinated and tiny sprouts develop, you can relocate your seedlings outdoors after the frost season has elapsed.

Choose a spot with proper drainage, excellent sunlight exposure, and mineralized soil.

Plant the seedlings in the soil bed, so the stem is 0.5 inches above the soil surface.

Plant the seedlings in the soil bed, so the stem is 0.5 inches above the soil surface

Plant Gerbera Daisy seedlings in the soil bed, so the stem is 0.5 inches above the soil surface

 

Growth

USDA hardiness zones 8 to 11 are ideal for Gerbera daisies.

In zone 8, however, the plant will need active protection from the cold weather during winter.

When mature, gerbera daisies can grow up to 1 to 3 feet (0.3-0.9 meters) tall and 0.6 to 1.3 feet wide (0.2-0.4 meters).

It takes about 14 to 18 weeks for gerbera daisies to bloom, and they have a moderate growth rate.

 

Common Problems for Gerbera Daisies

Gerbera daisies are typically susceptible to nasty pests, including aphids, spider mites, and whiteflies.

Pests like this are drawn to stressed plants.

Hence, the best way to keep them away is to ensure that your plant is always in excellent health.

Make sure to monitor your plant regularly for any habituating insects or pests.

You can easily scare away a tiny population with a spray of water.

However, if larger populations attack your plant,

try spraying insecticidal soap water all over your plant or make use of herbicides or horticultural oils like neem.

Gerbera daisies are typically susceptible to nasty pests, including aphids, spider mites, and whiteflies

Gerbera daisies are typically susceptible to nasty pests, including aphids, spider mites, and whiteflies

Leaf miners can also attack your gerbera daisy plant and feed on its leaves.

If you spot any damaged leaves on your plant where you can observe signs of tunneling, remove them right away.

Overwatering your plant can also prove to be detrimental.

Powdery mildew, crown, and root rot are easier to grow when there is too much moisture.

In moist conditions, grey mildew can instantly develop and infect the plant’s roots and stems, causing it to die.

Brown dots on the leaves are one of the most prevalent symptoms of mildew infestation.

To avoid these issues, be careful to water your plant only when the soil appears visibly dry, and adequately allow the soil to dry in between waterings.

Make sure that greenhouses are well-aerated. Do not use a humidifier as it can further sustain moist conditions.

At the same time, it is crucial not to leave the flowers un-watered, as they can wilt and die.

Leaf miners can also attack your gerbera daisy plant and feed on its leaves.

Leaf miners can also attack your gerbera daisy plant and feed on its leaves.

 

Tips for Growing Gerbera Daisies

  • The ideal time to start growing your gerbera daisy plant is in the spring season.
  • Begin with germinating the seeds indoors and then transplanting the plant outdoors in late spring or early summer.
  • Before transplanting, ensure that your plant has developed at least two sets of leaves, which can take around 15-30 days. Also, ensure that any frost threat has passed.
  • Choose a planting site with good sunlight exposure and adequate shade for the baby gerberas.
  • Dig holes in the soil that are big enough to accommodate the gerbera’s roots, then gently position the plant in place and seal it with soil.
  • Overwatering your gerbera daisy plant might cause root rot, so be careful.
  • Just make sure to water soil when it appears dry, and avoid using humidifiers.
  • While gerberas can tolerate cold temperatures, it is ideal for growing them at temperatures ranging from 70 to 75 Fahrenheit (21 to 23 degrees Celsius)
  • Don’t forget to use a potting mix made of rich, organic matter.
Tips for Growing Gerbera Daisies

Tips for Growing Gerbera Daisies

 

Frequently Asked Questions About How To Grow and Care for Gerbera Daisy

 

Is there any difference between Gerbera daisies and Shasta daisies?

Although both plants appear visibly quite similar, there are distinct differences that distinguish one from the other.

Unlike Gerberas, Shasta daisies are native to Europe and Japan and are a nursery hybrid.

Moreover, they take substantially lesser time to bloom and have minimal straightforward plant care needs and hence are generally low-maintenance.

 

Can Gerbera daisies be grown indoors?

Though gerbera daisies are initially seeded indoors, it is ideal not to grow them inside over a long period.

Gerberas usually do not bloom or last long indoors. Once the seeds are germinated and have developed two sets of leaves,

transplant the seedling outdoors before the first expected frost in your region.

Outdoor conditions are best for the plant’s healthy growth, especially if you pick a spot with substantial sunlight exposure alongside shade.

 

How can I make Gerbera daisies bloom?

Regular trimming of Gerbera daisies during the growing season is quite beneficial.

If you are looking to get your plant to bloom, take adequate care of its needs, and trim off dead leaves and fading blooms.

If any flower stalks appear to be dying, trim them where they meet the leaves

Additionally, for blooming, it is also crucial to fertilize the plant’s soil regularly once a month with fertilizers that are rich in phosphorus and nitrogen.

 

Are Gerbera daisies toxic?

Gerbera daisies are non-toxic plants to both humans and animals.

However, it is crucial to note that ingesting the plant’s leaves and flowers can cause animals gastrointestinal discomfort.

 

Conclusion On How To Grow and Care for Gerbera Daisy

Gerbera Daisies will thrive if grown in the right environment, and their plant care needs are satisfied.

Brighten up your living space by pairing Gerberas Daisies with vibrant-looking flowers with yellow or blue foliage.

If you find your Gerbera Daisy plant clustered with too many blooms, you can remove a few large leaves to make it less bushy.

Don’t forget to deadhead blooms that are faded to keep the overall plant looking fresh and healthy.

Author Bio

Daniel Iseli

Taking care of houseplants and gardening are my greatest passions. I am transforming my apartment into an urban jungle and am growing veggies in my indoor and outdoor garden year-round.