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30 Houseplants That are Toxic for Cats [2022]

Plants are a great décor to have in your homes and outdoor gardens.

But several plants that are not toxic to humans can be dangerous for pets.

The solution to this problem isn’t stopping to grow houseplants but keeping plants that are non-toxic for your cats.

Houseplants that are toxic for cats should be kept away from your felines.

To make sure you know what houseplants are harmful to cats. take a look at this list of the most common indoor plants that are toxic for cats and other pets.

Houseplants That are Toxic for Cats

  1. Aloe
  2. Alocasia
  3. Poinsettia
  4. Sago Palm
  5. Amaryllis
  6. Asparagus Fern
  7. Arrow-Head Vine
  8. Azalea
  9. Begonia
  10. Bay Laurel
  11. Caladium
  12. Pothos or “Devil’s Ivy”
  13. Clivia
  14. Cardboard Palm
  15. Dieffenbachia
  16. Chrysanthemum
  17. Easter Lily
  18. Dracaena
  19. Geranium
  20. Tulip and Narcissus
  21. English Ivy
  22. Indian Rubber Plant
  23. Yew
  24. Hyacinth
  25. Philodendron
  26. Kalanchoe
  27. Mauna Loa Peace Lily
  28. Jade Plant
  29. Spider Plant
  30. Lantana
30 Plants That are Toxic for Cats

30 Houseplants That are Toxic for Cats

30 Houseplants That are Toxic for Cats

1. Aloe

Aloe, despite its various beneficial properties for humans, is poisonous for cats

Aloe, despite its various beneficial properties for humans, is poisonous for cats

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that has many benefits in the gel-like substance that are present within their leaves.

However, Aloe vera is poisonous to felines and canines. If your pets ingest this plant, they will experience GI symptoms that include vomiting and diarrhea, among other symptoms.

This is because Aloe contains saponins and anthraquinones according to ASCPA.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Aloe vera
  • Family: Asphodelaceae
  • Temperature: 55 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13-to-27-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: does not need to be fertilized. Once every six to twelve months is fine
  • pH: 4.5 to 5.5
  • Soil: mix of chunks of bark, lava rock, and perlite
  • Lighting: needs minimum 6 hours of sunlight exposure daily
  • Growth rate: slow-growing but grows faster than other succulents
  • Humidity: does not require humidity

2. Alocasia

When ingested by cats, Alocasia can cause their mouth, lips, and tongue to burn

When ingested by cats, Alocasia can cause their mouth, lips, and tongue to burn

Alocasia, also known as elephant ears, is a stunning plant with large elephant ear-like leaves.

If ingested by pets, it can cause the mouth, lips, and tongue to burn. Vomiting and drooling are also common symptoms.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Alocasia
  • Family: Araceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-29-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: no fertilization needed during fall and winter
  • pH: 5.5 to 6.5
  • Soil: well-draining potting mix, crumbly loam, or loose soil
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: slow-growing
  • Humidity: 50% to 60%

3. Poinsettia

Despite being a popular plant during the Christmas season, Poinsettia isn't ideal to be grown when you have cats at home

Despite being a popular plant during the Christmas season, Poinsettia isn’t ideal to be grown when you have cats at home

Poinsettia is a holiday plant that is often gifted to other people during special celebrations.

However, you should reconsider this gift if your friends or family have pets at home.

Even though ingesting this plant is not deadly for pets, it can cause irritation within their stomach and mouth.

This irritation can lead to vomiting or diarrhea.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Euphorbia pulcherrima
  • Family: Spurges
  • Temperature: 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-21-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Use common fertilizer once every month from spring to summer
  • pH: 5.8 to 6.3
  • Soil: Needs loose, porous, and well-draining soil
  • Lighting: bright, diffused sunlight
  • Growth rate: moderate to slow
  • Humidity: 50% – 75%

4. Sago Palm

Sago Palm contains cycasin which can cause your cats to experience liver damage or even liver failure when ingested

Sago Palm contains cycasin which can cause your cats to experience liver damage or even liver failure when ingested

Sago Palm has a substance called cycasin; this causes vomiting, gastroenteritis, and other symptoms.

If the case is severe, a pet can also suffer liver damage or liver failure.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Cycas revoluta
  • Family: Cycadaceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized three times from early April to early September
  • pH: 6.5 to 7.0
  • Soil: sandy soil that is slightly rich in organic matter
  • Lighting: eight hours of sunlight
  • Growth rate: moderate
  • Humidity: 70% or more

5. Amaryllis

Despite the beautiful red flowers that Amaryllis grow, it's poisonous for your cats

Despite the beautiful red flowers that Amaryllis grow, it’s poisonous for your cats

Amaryllis is a beautiful plant that grows red flowers (if Amaryllis doesn’t bloom, find out what causes it not to).

If your pet ends up ingesting it, then it can have the following symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Tremors
  • Drooling
  • Stomach pain
  • diarrhea

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Amaryllis
  • Family: Amaryllidaceae
  • Temperature: 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (21-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: use a slow-release liquid fertilizer every three-to-four month
  • pH: 6.0 to 6.8
  • Soil: quick-draining soil with a mix of peat and Perlite
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: moderate growth
  • Humidity: 65%

6. Asparagus Fern

Asparagus Fern contains sapogenin that can cause dermatitis in cats

Asparagus Fern contains sapogenin that can cause dermatitis in cats

Asparagus Fern contains sapogenin, a compound that causes dermatitis in cats and other pets.

Hence, think twice if you’re planning to divide an Asparagus fern if you’ve got cats in the house.

The berries that grow on Asparagus Fern are poisonous for all pets, and, if ingested it can cause:

  • Stomach pain
  • Vomiting
  • diarrhea

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Asparagus Setaceus
  • Family: Asparagaceae
  • Temperature: Close to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21 degrees Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: during summer, feed weekly. Otherwise, feed the plant monthly
  • pH: 6.5-6.8
  • Soil: well-draining, loose and moist soil
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 60 to 70%

7. Arrowhead Vine

Arrowhead Vine contains oxalates that are poisonous to cats when they ingest them

Arrowhead Vine contains oxalates that are poisonous to cats when they ingest them

A common bedding plant, the Arrowhead Vine contains calcium oxalates that can burn the lips, tongue, and mouth of your pet.

It can also cause drooling and vomiting.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Araceae
  • Family: Alismataceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-27-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized once a month throughout spring, summer, and fall
  • pH: 6.5 – 7.5
  • Soil: Perlite and orchid bark
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast to moderate
  • Humidity: 25%

8. Azalea

Azaleas contain grayanotoxins, which are compounds deemed extremely toxic for cats and dogs

Azaleas contain grayanotoxins, which are compounds deemed extremely toxic for cats and dogs

Azalea is a shrub plant that is mostly grown outdoors, hence, the need to properly space your Azaleas when planted in your garden.

However, you can also grow your azalea indoors as bonsai trees.

Azalea contains a substance known as grayanotoxin, which is very toxic for pets such as cats and dogs.

If it is ingested by pets, it can cause several issues, from diarrhea to putting your pet in a coma.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Rhododendron
  • Family: Ericaceae
  • Temperature: 0 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (-17-to-32-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: organic soil with the occasional addition of compost
  • pH: 4.5 to 6.0
  • Soil: Needs soil that is rich in humus, is moist and well-draining
  • Lighting: plant under the afternoon shade and morning sun
  • Growth rate: slow growth
  • Humidity: 40% or higher

9. Begonia

Begonia, like the Arrowhead vine, contains oxalates that causes oral irritation in cats

Begonia, like the Arrowhead vine, contains oxalates that causes oral irritation in cats

Begonia is a common houseplant that is also deadly for pets.

The substance named oxalates within it can cause oral irritation in cats.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Begonia
  • Family: Begoniaceae
  • Temperature: 60 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (15-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized every two weeks with a balanced fertilizer
  • pH: 5.2 – 6.0
  • Soil: Needs sandy loam soil with compost
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast to moderate growth
  • Humidity: 70-90%

10. Bay Laurel

Bay Laurel, despite being beneficial to humans, is toxic to your cats

Bay Laurel, despite being beneficial to humans, is toxic to your cats

Bay Laurel is a herb that you can grow as an indoor-outdoor plant.

While this herb is good for humans, it can cause bowel obstructions, vomiting, and diarrhea in pets.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Laurus nobilis
  • Family: Laurels
  • Temperature: 20 degrees Fahrenheit and above (-6 degree Celsius and above)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized in spring and mid-summer
  • pH: 4.5–8.3
  • Soil: well-draining soil such as rocky or sandy soil
  • Lighting: full sun to partial shade
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 70 to 90%

11. Caladium

Caladium, like your Begonia and Arrowhead Vine, has oxalates that are toxic to your cats

Caladium, like your Begonia and Arrowhead Vine, has oxalates that are toxic to your cats

Caladium is another plant that has oxalate in it.

Similar to other oxalate-containing plants, Caladium also causes drooling, oral irritation, and vomiting in pets when ingested.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Caladium
  • Family: Araceae.
  • Temperature 65 to 80degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-26-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized once a month from spring to summer
  • pH: 5.5 to 6.5
  • Soil: Caladium grown in pots need to be fertilized every two weeks
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: around 50%

12. Pothos or “Devil’s Ivy”

Another oxalate-containing plant, Pothos or Devil's Ivy causes oral irritation to your cats once they ingest it

Another oxalate-containing plant, Pothos or Devil’s Ivy causes oral irritation to your cats once they ingest it

Pothos also contain oxalate and will cause oral irritation along with other symptoms in your pets.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Epipremnum aureum
  • Family: Araceae
  • Temperature: 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (21-to-32-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized once a month from spring to summer
  • pH: 6.1 to 6.5
  • Soil: Needs nutrient-rich soil that is well-draining
  • Lighting: moderate lighting
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 50-70%

13. Clivia

A plant that looks similar to Amaryllis, Clivia is a known toxic plant to cats

A plant that looks similar to Amaryllis, Clivia is a known toxic plant to cats

Clivia is a stunning flowering plant that has a similar look to Amaryllis.

However, the alkaloids within it cause the following symptoms and more:

  • Arrhythmia
  • Low blood pressure
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Clivia
  • Family: Amaryllidaceae
  • Temperature: above 40 degrees Fahrenheit (above 5 degrees Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized in spring once it starts to bloom
  • pH: 6.1 to 7.8
  • Soil: Needs nutrient-rich soil that is well-draining
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: slow growth
  • Humidity: 30 to 50%

14. Cardboard Palm

Cardboard Palm is toxic for cats

Cardboard Palm is toxic for cats

Cardboard Palm is a shrub that contains cycasin which can cause serious issues related to liver failure and gastroenteritis.

There are many other shrub species that are pet friendly; unfortunately, Cardboard Palm is not one of them.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Zamia furfuracea
  • Family: Zamiaceae
  • Temperature: 60 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (15-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: use a slow-release fertilizer
  • pH: 6.0
  • Soil: sandy and well-draining
  • Lighting: full sunlight
  • Growth rate: slow
  • Humidity: 20 to 40%

15. Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachia, aka Dumb Canes, also contains oxalates that is toxic for cats

Dieffenbachia, aka Dumb Canes, also contains oxalates that is toxic for cats

Dieffenbachia, also known as Dumb canes, comes in many different varieties.

It contains toxic proteolytic enzymes and oxalates that can cause drooling, vomiting, and oral burns.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Dieffenbachia
  • Family: Araceae
  • Temperature: 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (16-to-27-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs heavy fertilizer every four to six weeks
  • pH: 6.1–6.5
  • Soil: fertile, high peat content, and well-draining potting mix
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: slow
  • Humidity: 60%

16. Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum is a plant that you can grow indoors, but not recommended when you have cats as it is toxic to them

Chrysanthemum is a plant that you can grow indoors, but not recommended when you have cats as it is toxic to them

Chrysanthemum is a stunning plant that can’t withstand cold temperatures.

Hence growing them indoors is always a better option. Yet, if you’re taking care of pets in your home, then this plant can be poisonous to them.

Chrysanthemum can cause the following symptoms if ingested:

  • Hyper-salivation
  • Dermatitis
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of coordination
  • Diarrhea

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Chrysanthemum
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Temperature: 55 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit (13-to-20-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized from March to May
  • pH: 6.5 to 7.0
  • Soil: well-draining soil that remains moist
  • Lighting: indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast to moderate 
  • Humidity: 70-90%

17. Easter Lily

Easter Lily, a commonly-gifted plant for indoor growth, is toxic for your cats

Easter Lily, a commonly-gifted plant for indoor growth, is toxic for your cats

Easter Lily is a simple yet elegant plant that usually grows outdoors. But sometimes, people grow them as indoor plants to gift to others.

However, Easter Lily can cause cats to have kidney failure and vomiting if they end up consuming it.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Lilium longiflorum
  • Family: Liliaceae
  • Temperature: 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit (16-to-18-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized during the growing season
  • pH: 6.0- 6.8
  • Soil: well-draining and loamy soil
  • Lighting: full sunlight
  • Growth rate: Moderate to Fast
  • Humidity: 30 to 50%

18. Dracaena

Dracaena contains saponin, a compound that is toxic for cats

Dracaena contains saponin, a compound that is toxic for cats

Dracaena contains a substance known as saponin, and this can cause symptoms such as vomiting and excessive drooling in cats, as well as dilated pupils.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Dracaena
  • Family: Asparagaceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: once in spring and in early autumn
  • pH: 6.0 to 6.5 
  • Soil: well-draining, chunky soil mix
  • Lighting: low or medium sunlight
  • Growth rate: slow
  • Humidity: 60% to 80%

19. Geranium

Geranium contains two compounds, linalool and geraniol, that is toxic for cats

Geranium contains two compounds, linalool and geraniol, that is toxic for cats

Geranium is a flowering plant with various colors that is planted both indoors and outdoors. But it has two chemicals within it known as linalool and geraniol.

These two chemicals can cause anorexia, vomiting, and dermatitis in dogs and cats.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Pelargonium
  • Family: Geraniaceae
  • Temperature: 60 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (16-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized balanced fertilizer
  • pH: 6.0 and 6.5
  • Soil: loamy soil that drains well
  • Lighting: bright light
  • Growth rate: Fast to slow growth
  • Humidity: 50 to 70%

20. Tulip and Narcissus

Despite being a common gift to families and friends due to their beauty, Tulip and Narcissus aren't recommended for cat owners as they're toxic to felines

Despite being a common gift to families and friends due to their beauty, Tulip and Narcissus aren’t recommended for cat owners as they’re toxic to felines

Tulip and Narcissus are lovely plants that can be given to friends and families as a gift.

But, the bulbs on this plant are poisonous that can cause:

  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Stomach pain
  • Liver damage
  • irritation

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Narcissus pseudonarcissus
  • Family: Liliaceae
  • Temperature: 29 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit (-2-to-12-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized once a month from spring to summer
  • pH: 6 to 7
  • Soil: loose, well-draining, and crumbly soil
  • Lighting: full light
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 65-85%

21. English Ivy

The leaves of the English Ivy are toxic for your cats

The leaves of the English Ivy are toxic for your cats

English Ivy is a bedding plant that has toxic leaves.

If cats or dogs end up consuming it, they will have stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and even drooling due to the saponins within it.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Hedera helix
  • Family: Araliaceae
  • Temperature: 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (21-to-32-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized every two weeks during spring to summer
  • pH: 6.5 to 7.0
  • Soil: loamy and well-draining
  • Lighting: bright light but not direct sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 40% or higher

22. Indian Rubber Plant

The Indian Rubber Plant contains two compounds, ficin and ficusin, that are toxic for your cat friends

The Indian Rubber Plant contains two compounds, ficin and ficusin, that are toxic for your cat friends

Indian Rubber Plant is a small indoor plant that looks like a tree. It contains two toxic enzymes known as ficin and ficusin.

These two enzymes are not harmful to humans, but they are harmful to pets.

If your pet consumes it, they will have oral irritation, dermatitis, loss of coordination, and vomiting.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Ficus elastica
  • Family: Moraceae
  • Temperature: 75 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (24-to-27-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Apply fertilizer every three to four weeks during the growing season
  • pH: 5.5 – 7.5
  • Soil: mix of peat, Perlite, and vermiculite
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 40-50%

23. Yew

You can grow Yew indoors as a bonsai for Christmas decor, but be careful with it when you have cats as its toxic to them

You can grow Yew indoors as a bonsai for Christmas decor, but be careful with it when you have cats as its toxic to them

Yew is an evergreen plant that is grown indoors as a bonsai tree or can even be used as a Christmas decoration.

However, they contain a substance known as taxine that is toxic for cats and dogs.

The early signs of ingestion include muscular tremors, seizures, and also cardiac failure.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Taxus baccata
  • Family: Taxaceae
  • Temperature: 5 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit ((-15)-to-(-12)-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized in spring
  • pH: 5.3 to 7.8
  • Soil: rich loamy soil
  • Lighting: Full, partial sunlight
  • Growth rate: slow

24. Hyacinth

Another commonly gifted plant, Hyacinth is toxic for cats

Another commonly gifted plant, Hyacinth is toxic for cats

Hyacinth is another popular plant that is often given as a gift to other people.

However, Hyacinth is toxic for dogs and cats. If ingested, your pets can have the following symptoms:

  • Tremors
  • Diarrhea with blood
  • Severe vomiting

It is believed that all these symptoms are caused by alkaloids within the plant, which are mainly present within the bulbs.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Hyacinthus
  • Family: Asparagaceae
  • Temperature: 40 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit (4-to-7-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: fertilize it a few weeks after it blooms
  • pH: 6.0 to 7.0
  • Soil: loamy and well-draining soil
  • Lighting: indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 70 to 80%

25. Philodendron

Philodendron is another oxalate-containing plant that is toxic for cats

Philodendron is another oxalate-containing plant that is toxic for cats

Philodendron comes in many varieties, but all these varieties of Philodendron contain oxalate crystals that will cause burns in the mouths of your pets according to the National Poison Center.

This substance can also cause problems with swallowing and excessive salivation.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Philodendron
  • Family: Araceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-21-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized once a month from spring to summer
  • pH: 5.0 to 6.0
  • Soil: Needs nutrient-rich soil with a mix of peat, Perlite, and vermiculite
  • Lighting: medium to bright sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 65 to 80%

26. Kalanchoe

Despite the stunning flowers that Kalanchoe grows, it is toxic for cats

Despite the stunning flowers that Kalanchoe grows, it is toxic for cats

Kalanchoe, also known as the Widows-thrill, is another stunning flowering plant that is poisonous to your pets.

It contains bufadienolides, which can cause arrhythmia, diarrhea, and vomiting.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Kalanchoe
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-29-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized once a month
  • pH: 5.8 to 6.3
  • Soil: well-draining soil, with a mix of peat and Perlite
  • Lighting: natural, bright sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 75 to 85%

27. Mauna Loa Peace Lily

Mauna Loa Peace Lily, like Philodendron, contains oxalates that are toxic for cats

Mauna Loa Peace Lily, like Philodendron, contains oxalates that are toxic for cats

Mauna Loa Peace Lily contains calcium oxalate that is poisonous for pets like cats and can cause difficulty swallowing, burning of the mouth, drooling, and much more.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Spathiphyllum
  • Family: Araceae
  • Temperature: 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-29-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized with slow-release fertilizer in the growing season
  • pH: 5.0 to 6.5
  • Soil: Moist, but not soggy soil
  • Lighting: indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 40 to 70%

28. Jade Plant

Jade Plant is toxic for cats and dogs, but the cause of its toxicity is still unknown

Jade Plant is toxic for cats and dogs, but the cause of its toxicity is still unknown

Jade Plant is also known to be toxic for cats and dogs, but the reason behind this toxicity is unknown.

All that is known is that Jade Plant will cause nausea and vomiting in pets when consumed.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Crassula ovata
  • Family: Stonecrops
  • Temperature: 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (18-to-24-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Once every six months
  • pH: 6.0
  • Soil: basic, acidic soil
  • Lighting: bright light for 6 hours
  • Growth rate: slow grower
  • Humidity: 30 to 50%

29. Spider Plant

Grow your Spider Plant in a hanging basket if you have cats at home as its toxic for them

Grow your Spider Plant in a hanging basket if you have cats at home as its toxic for them

Spider Plants are a death trap for homes with cats since they are very easily attracted to this plant due to their long and wiggly legs. 

While this plant is generally considered non-toxic, it does have compounds within it that can cause stomach pain, diarrhea, and vomiting in cats.

Thus, it is wise to place this plant in hanging baskets or just far away from cats.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Chlorophytum comosum
  • Family: Asparagaceae 
  • Temperature: 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (21-to-32-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needed once in 2 weeks when the growing season comes
  • pH: 6.1 to 6.5
  • Soil: well-draining, loamy, and moist soil
  • Lighting: bright, indirect sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 40%-60%

30. Lantana

Keep Lantana away from cats as its toxic for them

Keep Lantana away from cats as its toxic for them

The Lantana plant’s stunning foliage is poisonous to several animals ranging from house pets to livestock. 

The pentacyclic triterpenoids within the leaves cause weakness, labored breathing, and in severe cases, liver failure.

Its binomial nomenclature and basic plant care requirements include:

  • Scientific name: Lantana camara
  • Family: verbena
  • Temperature: 55 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13-to-27-degree Celsius)
  • Fertilizer: Needs to be fertilized in early spring
  • pH: 6-6.5
  • Soil: well-draining and acidic soil
  • Lighting: bright sunlight
  • Growth rate: Fast
  • Humidity: 70% or more

Conclusion About Houseplants That are Toxic for Cats

Here is a list of houseplants that are toxic for cats:

  1. Aloe
  2. Alocasia
  3. Poinsettia
  4. Sago Palm
  5. Amaryllis
  6. Asparagus Fern
  7. Arrow-Head Vine
  8. Azalea
  9. Begonia
  10. Bay Laurel
  11. Caladium
  12. Pothos or “Devil’s Ivy”
  13. Clivia
  14. Cardboard Palm
  15. Dieffenbachia
  16. Chrysanthemum
  17. Easter Lily
  18. Dracaena
  19. Geranium
  20. Tulip and Narcissus
  21. English Ivy
  22. Indian Rubber Plant
  23. Yew
  24. Hyacinth
  25. Philodendron
  26. Kalanchoe
  27. Mauna Loa Peace Lily
  28. Jade Plant
  29. Spider Plant
  30. Lantana

Author Bio

Daniel Iseli

Taking care of houseplants and gardening are my greatest passions. I am transforming my apartment into an urban jungle and am growing veggies in my indoor and outdoor garden year-round.