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Anthurium Hookeri Care Explained in Great Detail

Anthurium Hookeri Care Explained in Great Detail

Anthurium hookeri plants are one of a kind. They’re not the type of tropical plant you’ll find in any plant lover’s home. Because they’re not as widely known as the others.

These plants need bright but indirect sunlight as well as moist soil to grow. Using well-draining soil will prevent both over-watering and under-watering this plant.

In the tropics, the Anthurium hookeri plant is epiphytic. But what does epiphytic mean exactly?

An epiphytic plant has the amazing ability to grow without soil. In the tropical forests where these plants originate, they grow on top of other plants and even trees.

But that’s not the only cool thing about the Anthurium hookeri. This Anthurium plant grows white berries.

It also grows fascinating flowers in the center of the plant. Hence its’ nickname as the “Birds Nest Anthurium”.

This Anthurium plant also produces wrinkly leaves in a full and lush green color. They look as tropical as they truly are.

Even though they’re not the most common plant, they’re worth the work it takes to care for them.

In this article, we’ll go over everything you need to know to care for your new Anthurium hookeri plant.

 


 
Anhurium Hookeri Best Care Tips
 

Anthurium Hookeri Plant Care Instructions

 

Soil

According to the University of Florida, well-draining soil works wonders for Anthurium plants. This includes the Anthurium hookeri.

Well-draining soil prevents both over-watering and under-watering your plant.

This type of soil has materials that hold onto the moisture your plant needs when you water it.

But the soil is also aerated enough for any excess water to fall through to the bottom.

A plant pot with drainage holes helps so excess water runs through instead of sitting at the bottom of the soil.

For an Anthurium hookeri plant, use half potting soil and half orchid soil. It’s a great well-draining soil combination.

Double-check the soil to see if it’s still draining the way it should. If not, consider adding some perlite to your soil mix.

 

Light

Anthurium hookeri plants need bright but indirect sunlight for optimal health. They need to absorb plenty of light to thrive and to go through photosynthesis.

Without plenty of light, there will also be fewer flowers growing inside of the leaves. The more flowers the merrier.

But this plant is vulnerable when under direct sunlight. Direct sunlight scorches the leaves and leaves hideous marks that don’t heal.

This isn’t only a recommendation for sunlight, either. If you use artificial lights instead of natural, you still want to protect it from direct light.

Don’t place your plant right under the artificial lights.

Where these Anthuriums originate from, they receive plenty of sunlight. But they’re protected from direct rays because they grow beneath larger plants.

 

Watering

Like most Anthurium plants, the Anthurium hookeri needs moist (but not saturated) soil.

You want to avoid over-watering this plant. This will lead to poor health, fungi, or even root rot.

When the soil is too saturated, oxygen can’t get through to the roots. This factor and the over-abundance of water rots the roots of the plant.

If all the roots become rotten, your Anthurium plant isn’t going to survive. It’s best to try to avoid over-watering your plant at all costs.

Or at least catch the root rot before it spreads to all the roots.

But you don’t want to under-water the plant either. An under-watered plant grows slow.

If it’s left under-watered for a long time, the plant will die.

To check if your Anthurium hookeri plant needs water, place your finger into the soil to your big knuckle.

When the soil is still moist down to your fingertip, you can skip on watering the plant. You’ll notice that soil sticks to your finger when you pull it out of the soil.

When the soil is dry to your fingertip, it’s time to water the Anthurium.

 

Temperature

An Anthurium hookeri plant should be in an environment with a temperature range of 70F (21C) and 90F (32C).

Since these are tropical plants, the temperature should never drop lower than 55F (13C). They can’t withstand cold temperatures for long periods.

Never let frost develop on the leaves of your Anthurium hookeri.

 

Humidity

High humidity is best for an Anthurium hookeri plant. They need lots of humidity as they would receive in tropical forests.

For this Anthurium, you want a humidity level of around 80%.

Most homes don’t have high humidity, especially not homes in dry areas. But creating humidity is super easy.

The most popular method of creating humidity is the pebble tray method. It’s simple to do and inexpensive.

You’re going to need a tray, pebbles, and some water. That’s all.

Fill the tray to the very top with smooth pebbles. Once the tray is full of pebbles, fill the tray with water.

Make sure the water doesn’t surpass the pebbles. It needs to sit under the top layer.

Now all you have to do is place your Anthurium hookeri on top of the pebbles. As the water evaporates, it creates moisture in the air. This moisture goes right to your plant.

Whenever the water runs out, fill the tray back up.

Another common method is to spritz your leaves with clean water from a spray bottle. The water will evaporate, creating humidity.

When you use this method, be careful not to drench your leaves. Too much water will sit on your leaves and create fungi.

It’s the same as over-watering your plant.

You can also buy a humidifier. These machines not only allow you to create humidity but most let you decide how much humidity to create.

 

Fertilizer

You should fertilize your Anthurium hookeri plant once a month while it’s still growing.

When your plant has matured, you’ll only need to fertilize it once every three or four months.

This Anthurium plant needs fertilizer with a high amount of phosphate. The phosphate ensures the leaves of your plant are lush.

The fertilizer should be half strength. Full strength fertilizer can be too much and cause salt to build up in the soil.

 

Propagation

The easiest way to propagate an Anthurium hookeri is by using stem cuttings.

But it’s also possible to propagate this plant using the seeds. There’s a higher success rate compared to trying to propagate other plants with seeds.

Keep reading to find out how to propagate your Anthurium hookeri using either method.

 

Growth

Anthurium hookeri plants don’t grow to be very big. They usually only grow to be between four inches to two feet in height.

The leaves on this plant grow to be between one foot and three feet in length.

 

Potting

Anthurium hookeri plants grow slower than many other indoor plants. So, you only need to re-pot them every two to three years.

Check the drainage holes in your plant pots. When the roots start to creep out, it’s time to re-pot your plant.

Even though it’s a long time between re-potting, you still need to make sure it gets done.

Otherwise, the growth of your plant will slow down or even stop altogether.

Anthurium hookeri plants are easy to repot but you have to be careful with the roots. All roots are fragile and it doesn’t take much force to tear them.

Since this plant is epiphytic, you don’t want to plant the roots too deep into the soil.

 

Anthurium Hookeri Propagation Steps

If you’re a newbie to propagating plants, we’re going to walk you through the steps using stem cuttings. This is the easiest and most successful method to use.

But if you want to try something advanced, we’re also going to walk you through propagation using seeds.

Keep in mind, you need to start at the beginning with the original plant for this process.

 

Using Stem Cuttings

  1. You want a healthy Anthurium hookeri stem cutting. This stem cutting should be at least three inches in length and there should be two leaf nodes attached. Make sure you cut right beneath a leaf node. Before you cut, sterilize your pruning shears. You can use 70% isopropyl alcohol to sterilize them. You can find this alcohol in most general stores.
  2. Once you’ve got your stem cutting, you have to leave the cutting out for a week. It should be sitting on a paper towel in a warm environment. This allows the cut end of the stem cutting to cure (or callous over). A cured end helps promote rooting later on.
  3. While you’re waiting for the stem cutting to cure, consider getting everything ready. Your plant pot should have drainage holes at the bottom to prevent water from building up. Fill it with well-draining soil.
  4. After a week is up, you can go ahead and plant your stem cutting. Use your finger to create a narrow hole in the soil. It should go as deep as your big knuckle. Place the stem cutting in this hole and pack soil around it. The packed soil should hold the stem cutting upright.
  5. If you’re having issues keeping the stem cutting upright, consider using a cut straw. Tie the plant to the straw until it can stand up on its own.
  6. Now that your stem cutting is in the soil you can go ahead and care for it. Make sure you water it to keep the soil moist. And make sure it’s getting adequate indirect sunlight. If your Anthurium plant sits in a window, rotate it so all sides get enough light. Before you know it, your stem cutting will become a brand new Anthurium hookeri plant.

 

Using Seeds

  1. To propagate an Anthurium hookeri using seeds, you need a plant that is producing seeds. The original Anthurium plant must have fruit. For this plant, the fruit happens to be white berries. When your plant first starts growing, you’ll notice it starts as a male and turns into a female later on. While the plant is still a male you want to collect the pollen it releases. You’ll keep the pollen inside your refrigerator.
  2. Now you have to wait for the original plant to turn into a female. You’ll know it’s turned when the spadix is bumpy. It might even start oozing a sap-like substance. Once it’s a female, you’re going to spread the pollen you collected earlier onto the spadix. Any small brush or even a cotton swab will work for this task.
  3. It takes at least six months for the Anthurium to start growing fruit. When the fruit is ripe, feel free to pull the fruit from the plant. Inside the berries there will be plenty of seeds.
  4. The seeds will be covered in a sticky substance. You have to clean this substance off the seeds and let them dry for at least 24 hours.
  5. Get your plant pot ready. It should have drainage holes at the bottom. Make sure you use well-draining soil.
  6. Plant the seeds right below the surface and keep some space between them. You don’t want the seeds planted too deep. Completely cover the seeds with the soil.
  7. Keep the plant pot covered during seed germination. That helps speed up the process by keeping the moisture contained. You still want to check the soil now and then to make sure the soil isn’t becoming saturated.
  8. Once a seed has sprouted, you can remove the cover. All that’s left is to care for it like you do the original Anthurium hookeri plant. Keep the soil moist and make sure it gets enough indirect sunlight.

 

Varieties of Anthuriums

Anthuriums are fun plants with a creative spin. They grow fruit and funky flowers. And you can’t forget their full foliage.

There are so many Anthurium species to choose from. Here are a few of our favorites besides the Anthurium hookeri plant.

 

Anthurium aramon

This Anthurium is a beautiful plant. It produces dark red flowers. These flowers sit alongside the lush green leaves that every Anthurium creates.

 

Anthurium elido

The Anthurium elido plant is also referred to as the “White Flamingo Anthurium”. This is because it produces pure white flowers that fit in with any home decor.

 

Anthurium livium

This plant is one of our absolute favorite Anthurium plants. The flowers produced by the plant are outstanding. They’re a pretty pink with gorgeous white streaks that flow towards the center.

 

Anthurium turenza

The Anthurium turenza has some of the brightest red flowers you’ll see in a tropical indoor plant. Not only are they bright but they also have a shiny quality to catch your eye.

 

Common Problems with the Anthurium Hookeri

Plant pests are the most common problem with the Anthurium hookeri plant. They’re susceptible to many different creepy crawlers.

If you’re going to find any plant pest on this plant, it’s most likely going to be a mealybug.

 

Mealybugs

Mealybugs are strange pests. They’re covered in a cotton-like substance that stands out when you inspect your plant.

Another major clue that you have an infestation is when your plant has a sticky wax substance.

This wax substance is waste. As a mealybug feeds, it leaves this waste behind to empty its’ stomach.

These plant pests feed on the sap inside of your plant. This means they steal all the important nutrients and hydration your plant needs.

They make your plant sick and if the infestation is left for too long they can even kill it.

 

Thrips

Another bug that enjoys the Anthurium plant is thrips. Thrips are very small creatures and they’re hard to get rid of once an infestation starts.

They’re hard to get rid of because thrips reproduce fast. Your plant will start with a few bugs. But within a week, those pests will have more than multiplied.

To spot a thrip infestation, you’ll see what looks like tiny pieces of thread on your plant. These are the actual insects.

When you shake your plant, they may try to fly away. But their wings are so lightweight, they can’t fly very far.

They use their sharp needle-shaped mouths to pierce through your plant. Then they suck out the sap.

Like the mealybug, thrips steal the energy and life from your Anthurium hookeri plant.

Since thrips reproduce so fast, there are hundreds of mouths feeding on your plant in no time. This will have dire consequences if not taken care of.

Defense is better than offense in this situation. One way you can prevent plant pests is to check every new plant you bring into your home.

You should also wash the leaves of your Anthurium hookeri as needed. Built-up dust attracts plant pests.

If you already have an infestation, try neem oil first. Neem oil is all-natural and you can use it on most plants. You want to test a small area first to be on the safe side.

Always dilute the neem oil with water. Fill a clean spray bottle with both fluids and shake.

Once you dilute the oil, go ahead and spray your Anthurium plant down. Within a few minutes, the plant pests will die.

Neem oil is a thick substance, so it suffocates most pests. And once they’re dead, you can wipe the insects off your plant.

Since some infestations are hard to end, you might want to consider a pesticide for indoor plants.

But this should be your last option since they contain so many chemicals.

 

Tips for an Unhappy Anthurium Hookeri

The Anthurium hookeri is susceptible to a few issues, like most Anthurium plants.

But most of these issues are easy to remedy. So, if your plant seems unhappy, you can cheer it up with some work.

Here are the most common problems with the Anthurium hookeri plant and how to solve them.

 

Your Anthurium Hookeri Plant’s Leaves are Turning Brown on the Edges

When the edges of an Anthurium hookeri’s leaves turn brown, it’s not getting the humidity it needs to thrive.

Never forget that this is a tropical plant. It originates from Ecuador. So, it thrives on high amounts of moisture in the air.

There are several ways to create humidity for a plant. The easiest way is to have a humidifier running nearby.

Once you get high humidity going for your plant, everything will be much better. You might have to trim off the bad leaves for aesthetic purposes.

 

Your Anthurium Hookeri Plant Isn’t Growing

Stunted growth in an Anthurium hookeri plant is a sign of over-watering. When you saturate the soil, oxygen can’t get through.

Without oxygen, your roots can’t absorb nutrients that cause growth or even boost growth.

If you let an over-watering issue go for too long, the roots will rot away.

You can check the Anthurium’s soil by sticking your finger into the soil. You should be able to feel if the soil is dry, moist, or saturated.

Since you know by the stunted growth that your plant’s roots aren’t getting enough oxygen, check the roots. Look for rot and see how far it’s advanced.

You can trim the bad roots if only a few are rotten. When all the roots are rotten, the Anthurium hookeri plant isn’t going to make it.

You’ll have to start checking the soil before you water the plant. Stick your finger in the soil, you’ll feel if it’s dry. Your plant is thirsty and it’s time to water it.

And if it’s moist, the soil will stick to your finger when you pull it from the soil. You should hold off on watering it and check again in a few days.

 

Your Anthurium Hookeri Plant’s Leaves are Browning and Dying

When an Anthurium hookeri plant’s leaves start to brown, you’re over-fertilizing. Especially if the leaves progress from browning to dying.

When you over-fertilize a plant, salt builds up in the soil. This extra salt can cause leaf burn.

It can also cause nitrogen to build up in the soil. Too much nitrogen can slow or even stop the growth of your Anthurium’s flowers.

To prevent over-fertilizing, only fertilize it once a month during the warm months. Once it’s dormant season hits, you only need to fertilize once in three months.

Also, make sure you’re using a half-strength fertilizer instead of full-strength.

If salt build-up is the cause of your plant’s unhappiness, you can flush the soil out.

All you have to do is run water through the soil to push out all that excess salt. Don’t have the water going full blast so you don’t damage your plant or it’s roots.

When all else fails, you may have to switch out the old soil for fresh soil.

 

Varieties of Anthuriums

Anthuriums are fun plants with a creative spin. They grow fruit and funky flowers. And you can’t forget their full foliage.

There are so many Anthurium species to choose from. Here are a few of our favorites besides the Anthurium hookeri plant.

 

Anthurium aramon

This Anthurium is a beautiful plant. It produces dark red flowers. These flowers sit alongside the lush green leaves that every Anthurium creates.

 

Anthurium elido

The Anthurium elido plant is also referred to as the “White Flamingo Anthurium”. This is because it produces pure white flowers that fit in with any home decor.

 

Anthurium livium

This plant is one of our absolute favorite Anthurium plants. The flowers produced by the plant are outstanding. They’re a pretty pink with gorgeous white streaks that flow towards the center.

 

Anthurium turenza

The Anthurium turenza has some of the brightest red flowers you’ll see in a tropical indoor plant. Not only are they bright but they also have a shiny quality to catch your eye.

 

Anthurium Hookeri FAQ

 

How long does it take for an Anthurium hookeri to grow?

It varies from plant to plant. But most Anthurium hookeri plants take up to four years to mature.

 

Are the white berries on my Anthurium hookeri eatable?

No, you’re not supposed to eat the white berries on your Anthurium hookeri. They’re not edible for humans. They’re not toxic but they can cause severe digestive problems.

 

Does the Anthurium hookeri flower?

Yes, the Anthurium hookeri flowers. It flowers for about three months out of the year.

 

Does the Anthurium hookeri clean the air?

Yes, Anthurium hookeri plants clean the air around them. They suck in the pollutants and release fresh oxygen in return.

 

Conclusion

The Anthurium hookeri plant is gorgeous. Between the white berries and the colorful flowers, you’ll be proud to display this plant out in the open.

Most of your friends won’t have this Anthurium in their tropical indoor plant collection.

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