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Philodendron Ring of Fire Care

Philodendron Ring of Fire Care

(image credits, IG: phoebeky_plants)

One of the most sought-after Philodendrons is the exceptional ‘Philodendron Ring of Fire.’ The beautiful plant does not have two, three, or even four colors; it is a rare combination of five colors, all occurring at different parts during various seasons throughout the year.

The wonderful Philodendron Ring of Fire is a slow grower; however, it is certainly worth the wait once it matures. It enjoys rich organic soils like aroid potting mixes and prefers average humidity, ranging from 30% to 60%. It prefers partially-shaded areas and likes to be fed tri-annually. A good trick to keep this beauty healthy is to keep it away from mucky, wet soils.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire was originally called the ‘Henderson’s Pride’; however, its name was later changed to the current one.

The tropical beauty is believed to be a hybrid between the Philodendron Wendlandii and Philodendron Tortum.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is slightly pricey; however, the attractive features and positive energy make up considerably well for it.

It usually grows out to be a very healthy-looking tropical plant that can climb walls and take up a decent amount of space for its roots.

 

 

Philodendron Ring of Fire Plant Care

 

Soil

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant grows exceptionally well when planted in moist, organic soils. It usually takes up nutrients gradually from its moist soil; therefore, the plant’s soil has to be kept slightly damp throughout the year.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire specifically likes rich nutritious soils such as an aroid mix. The soil should not hold excess water and allow sufficient air to pass through.

To help your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant grow even healthier, provide it with a mossy post. Alternatively, you can attach it to a burlap wrapped pole for climbing.

Some varieties of the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant prefer slightly acidic soils (6.1 to 6.5), while others grow best in neutral soils (6.6 to 7.3). I advise you to inquire about your plant’s preferred soil pH when you purchase it.

Please remember to keep the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant away from wet, muck soils as they can cause root-rot. Similarly, the plant should also be kept away from dry, sandy soils.

 

Water

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is not too fussy when it comes to its watering needs; it only has to be watered a few times in a month to mature. Due to its tropical nature, a slight delay in watering does not cause significant damage to the plant.

Ideally, the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant should be watered every 7 to 9 days during the active growing seasons of summer and spring. However, in the dormant seasons, winter and fall, the watering routine changes significantly.

During the resting months, water your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant after 2 to 3 weeks. The watering frequency mostly depends on the seasons; in the hotter months, the plant generally requires more water, whereas, in the cooler months, the plant does not grow much and so does not need too much water.

A rough yet accurate method to determine when the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant needs water is to assess its soil’s water content.

If the soil’s top 2 to 3 inches seem dry to you, feed some water to your Ring of Fire plant. However, if it is sufficiently moist, refrain from watering the soil till it dries out again.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant has a slow growth rate as it takes up nutrients slowly, allowing each part to absorb them fully.

For efficient absorption to occur, the Ring of Fire plant’s soil must be kept moist. Therefore, please ensure you keep it a little damp at all times.

Some varieties of the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant may need to be stored temporarily before being planted. If the same is your case, place it in a bucket filled with half an inch of water when it arrives.

Add some mulch for support and nutrient supply, and place this bucket in a shady area till it grows a bit. After a few days, move it to its actual location.

 

Light

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant can adapt to various light conditions. While it prefers bright, dappled sunlight, it can also do reasonably well in low light locations. However, a plant growing in the former surroundings is more likely to develop healthier parts than in the latter.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant can be grown indoors easily in several settings. One way is to simply put it in a classy neutral-colored or white pot; another option is to plant it from a hanging basket from a balcony door. The catch is to make this setting at a spot where only filtered light falls.

This plant can also be grown outdoors in a partially-shaded location as ground cover or tree-wrap to add some color to the tree’s brown trunk.

If you just want to grow it in a simple manner, place your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant in front of the east or south-facing window. Alternatively, you can place it under artificial growing lights.

Each of the settings mentioned above is most likely to provide your plant with the ideal lighting conditions. While sunlight is essential for this beauty, be sure not to place the Ring of Fire plant in direct sun rays as they will burn the plant’s leaves.

 

Temperature

The Philodendron Ring of Fire is a tropical plant; however, it does not necessarily have to be placed in scorching temperatures. It adjusts fairly well to mild temperatures and grows out just as well. Its mild temperature preference is another one of its ideal houseplant features.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant, like numerous Philodendrons, likes temperatures ranging from 55 degrees Fahrenheit to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (13 to 27 degrees Celsius). Anything too high will most likely cause leaf-scorching and loss of turgidity.

Similarly, temperatures that are too far below the ideal range will cause frosting, and ultimately, plant death. Therefore, maintaining your plant’s preferred temperatures is quite important.

If you reside in a temperate climate, managing this tropical beauty can be fairly easy. However, those living in extreme temperatures may have to put in a little more effort.

In the winters, bring your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant inside into a warmer environment. In cold months, you should protect it from frost and freezing temperatures.

Likewise, avoid keeping it in front of air conditioners and heaters as they often cause sudden temperature fluctuations.

 

Humidity

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant does not prefer extremes; the same is the case for its humidity requirements. The plant prefers mild humidity, which is often found in most households.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant’s ideal approximate humidity range is 30% to 60%. Its human-friendly humidity preference is another reason why it is a suitable houseplant choice, even for beginners.

However, if a resident of the dry and cold regions, you can still provide your beloved Philodendron Ring of Fire plant with its preferred humidity range. I recommend buying a humidifier to maintain adequate humidity levels.

Alternatively, you can mist your plant’s surroundings or group all your houseplants in a single room.

Please ensure that the humidity does not exceed 80%; a Philodendron Ring of Fire plant placed in such an environment is more likely to fall prey to a bacterial or fungal infection.

 

Fertilizer

No plant can grow without feed; therefore, providing quality feed to your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is necessary for its adequate healthy development.

The Ring of Fire plant does not need to be fed frequently; fertilizing it only a few times a year is enough. Feed your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant thrice a year with good-quality fertilizer, preferably, with a fertilizer especially for Philodendron plants.

Applying the fertilizer to moist soil aids in absorption and decreases the probability of salt buildup, and ultimately, toxicity.

You may use an instant-release fertilizer or a slow-release product. The latter is a more convenient option for the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant as well as the owner because with a slow-release fertilizer, feeding repeatedly is not necessary.

I advise you to feed this Philodendron plant only during summer and spring. Avoid fertilizing the plant in fall and winter as the plant does not actively grow during this time.

 

Repotting

The beautiful Philodendron Ring of Fire plant likes being slightly root-bound when growing; therefore, repotting it yearly is not required.

The plant has an extensive root system, which can take up considerable space. Therefore, while keeping it in a decently-sized pot is necessary, potting in a massive container is also a bad idea. As the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant likes being root-bound, choose a pot that fairly well balances the two extremes.

If you rather want a definite time to repot your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant, repot it after two to three years. This period gives the plant plenty of time to grow and flourish.

Another repotting indicator is the outgrowth of the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant’s roots from its container. I suggest you repot it if its roots begin to grow outside the plant’s container.

Please remember to wash out or replace the plant’s soil every time you repot it. Also, if using any gardening tools, please sanitize them first.

 

Pruning

There is no definite time for when you should prune a Philodendron Ring of Fire plant. Although it is a beautiful plant with its mesmerizing colors, pruning and maintaining it is necessary.

If you feel that your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is growing unruly leaves or outgrowing its given space, it is best to prune it. Similarly, if you notice any abnormal or yellow looking leaves, cut them off with a pair of pruning shears.

You can also prune your Philodendron Ring of Fire plant for simply giving it a fresh look; you can do this when you repot it or change its location.

I advise you to clean your pruning shears before using them on your Philodendron Ring of Fire or any other plant; this will minimize the spread of disease.

 

Propagation

The propagation process of the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is not too hard; it requires a few things such as a mature Ring of Fire plant, potting mix, water, container, and some rooting hormone, which is optional.

 

Follow the method below:

Cuttings Method

  • Please start with sterilizing your gardening knife and cut up a stem up to seven to eight inches (about 20cm). Choose the stem with two or more leaf nodes.
  • Then, prepare a potting mix containing all the right ingredients in correct ratios.
  • Next, clip the plant’s stem’s ends to dip it in rooting hormone.
  • To propagate the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant’s stem, place it in water or soil.
  • Ideally, place the stem in wet soil and keep a close eye on the plant; see if it can stand by itself.
  • After that, put the Ring of Fire plant in ample sunlight; however, the exposure must not be direct.
  • To check if your plant is growing roots, gently tug at it and see if you experience any resistance.
  • Lastly, excise patience and wait for the plant to grow.

Usually, when all steps have been followed correctly, and the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is placed in an ideal environment, it sprouts roots and shoots within two to three weeks.

Please take care of your plant during this time as it is susceptible to a lot of infections.

 

Blooms

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is primarily famous for its unique and attractive leaves; therefore, not much information is available regarding its blooms.

There are no reported blooms of the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant. However, some hybrid artificial varieties may produce flowers during the growing season.

 

Growth

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is one of the slow Philodendron plants. However, as mentioned earlier, the results are worth the wait. The plant can grow as tall as 3.3 feet (one meter). They are climbers and look beautiful hanging from baskets or in floor planters.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is well-known for its leaves, which are an excellent combination of various colors.

The leaves’ colors range from white to cream, from light to dark bottle green, and from orange to engine red. These leaves are pointed upwards and have curly edges.

The leaves are also of a considerable size of 12 to 16 inches (30 to 40 cm) in width and 24 inches (60cm) in length.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant, when placed outdoors, is placed in a 9b to 11 zones. However, on patios, zones 4a to 11 are considered better.

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is mostly growing well in 8-inch pots.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Ein Beitrag geteilt von Phoebe’s Plant Journal (@phoebeky_plants)

 

 

Common Problems for Philodendron Ring of Fire

 

Mealybugs

The mealybugs are soft-bodied pests that attach to the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant by their fringes. They suck out the plant’s sap juices, especially during the growth phase.

Over time, as the nutrients deplete, the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant’s leaves wrinkle and become yellow. To make things worse, the mealybugs leave honeydew behind, attracting other pests such as spider mites.

To get rid of them, use insecticidal soap or wash the mealybugs away with direct water jets.

 

Thrips

Thrips are similar to mealybugs and often feed on the plant’s nutrients. They cause the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant’s leaves to turn pale and silvery.

Please maintain your garden and keep it clean; a well-maintained garden is less likely to harbor thrips.

 

Water Stress

When the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is under-watered, it wilts. Therefore watering it every 7 to 9 days is necessary. Change your routine as necessary.

The plant’s leaves may also become yellow or scorch due to over-exposure to the sun. Please keep the plant in partially-shaded areas only.

 

Tips for Growing Philodendron Ring of Fire

  • Never use ice-cold or very hot water; you should use lukewarm water.
  • Slow-release fertilizers are best for the health of slow-growing Philodendrons.
  • Protect your Philodendron from direct sunlight.

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Philodendron Ring of Fire

 

When will my plant’s roots start growing after propagation?

After propagation, the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant usually takes two to three weeks to sprout roots.

 

What is the best soil for the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant?

The best soil type for the Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is one that is moist, rich, and organic. Aroid mixes are often excellent for Philodendrons; however, it must be kept moist.

 

Which pests most commonly attack a Philodendron Ring of Fire plant?

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant’s most common attackers includes spider mites, mealybugs, and cobweb forming insects. To reduce the probability of an attack, use insecticidal spray and dust often.

 

Conclusion

The Philodendron Ring of Fire plant is easy to care for and can transform even the dullest places with its vibrant colors. It requires filtered sunlight, with average humidity and watering. Although a little heavy on the pocket, it is sure to catch any visitor’s eye.

Do not let your pests feed on this toxic plant.

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