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15 Best Blueberry Companion Plants — Great Companion Plants

15 Best Blueberry Companion Plants — Great Companion Plants

This article will reveal great information about the best plant companions for blueberries. I am growing multiple blueberry bushes in my garden.

The blueberry is a woody shrub. According to the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society, it belongs to the Vaccinium genus. it is a perennial highbush that grows for multiple years.

I have tried different plants to grow well along with them. Not all of the companion plants worked!

Select companion plants that grow in the same environment to strengthen your blueberry shrub. Do not choose plants competing with blueberry plants for space or resources.

For the blueberry plant, choose companion plants that like acidic soil with a soil pH of around 4.5. Choose plants that attract pollinators in the spring to help blueberries propagate.

 

Blueberry Companion Plants 

The best blueberry companion plants are:

  1. Borage
  2. Thyme
  3. Strawberry
  4. Rhododendron
  5. Fern
  6. Lilac
  7. Hydrangea
  8. Sage
  9. Comfrey
  10. Dill
  11. Parsley
  12. Oak Trees
  13. Pine Trees
  14. Holly
  15. Mountain Laurel
Blueberry Companion Plants
Blueberry Companion Plants

 

15 Best Companion Plants for Blueberries

These are the plants that many gardeners plant with blueberries:

 

1. Borage

This beautiful blue flower is a perfect complement to your berry patch. It helps to attract the exact types of pollinators that blueberries need and deposits nutrients in the soil that help blueberries thrive.

Borage is one of the best companion plants for blueberries as they attract pollinators whose deposits also enrich the soil they're planted in
Borage is one of the best companion plants for blueberries as they attract pollinators whose deposits also enrich the soil they’re planted in

Planting borage alongside blueberries can even improve their taste. This is why borage is one of the best blueberry companion plants.

 

Why Plant Borage with Blueberries

  • Attracts pollinators
  • Deposits nutrients in the soil

 

2. Thyme

Thyme belongs to the Lamiaceae family. This fragrant is native to the Mediterranean.

This herb is excellent in your kitchen, but it can also protect blueberries as a ground cover that doubles as a pest repellent. Some insects that love to feed on ripe blueberries also hate the presence of thyme.

Thyme is another excellent companion plant for blueberries as it doubles up as ground cover and pest repellent
Thyme is another excellent companion plant for blueberries as it doubles up as ground cover and pest repellent

Thyme and blueberries are a great combination and excellent companion plants.

 

Why Plant Thyme with Blueberries

  • Ground cover
  • Repels Pests

 

3. Strawberry

Growing two of the most delicious berries in the same garden makes sense for many reasons. Strawberry plants love acidic soil as blueberries. However, they prefer it just a bit more alkaline.

Though both strawberries and blueberries love acidic soil, grow them a few feet apart
Though both strawberries and blueberries love acidic soil, grow them a few feet apart

It’s fun to have different types of berries in your garden. But keep in mind that plants need a lot of nutrients and water to produce delicious fruit.

Separate strawberries and blueberries by at least a few feet. Ensure they are not competing for resources and space. Both of these plants require space.

 

Why Plant Strawberries with Blueberries

  • Similar soil needs (acidic soil)

 

4. Rhododendron

These beautiful flowers are a great match for blueberries. They bloom in the spring, like blueberries, attracting the same important pollinators.

Rhododendrons love the kind of acidic soil that blueberries thrive in, but they require a little more shade like on a porch.

Aside from being an acidic soil-loving plant, rhododendrons also attract pollinators that blueberries need
Aside from being an acidic soil-loving plant, rhododendrons also attract pollinators that blueberries need

If your garden includes pine trees, you might want to plant Rhododendrons underneath them to relieve them from direct sunlight.

 

Why Plant Rhododendrons with Blueberries

  • Attract pollinators
  • Acid-loving plants

 

5. Fern

Ferns provide more lush green to your garden and can grow well in the same kind of conditions as blueberries, albeit with a lot more shade.

As ferns prefer to grow in shaded areas, they don't compete with the blueberries for the light, making them perfect companion plants
As ferns prefer to grow in shaded areas, they don’t compete with the blueberries for the light, making them perfect companion plants

Plant ferns underneath evergreen trees or shadowed areas, and reserve the sunniest spots for your blueberries.

 

Why Plant Fern with Blueberries

  • Prefer shaded areas and do not compete for light
  • Same needs

 

6. Lilac

Add some color to your garden with lilacs, which come in pink, white, and purple.

Though lilac adds color to your garden and attracts pollinators for your blueberries, they can outgrow your blueberries and block out the sunlight they need
Though lilac adds color to your garden and attracts pollinators for your blueberries, they can outgrow your blueberries and block out the sunlight they need

Lilac shrubs are easy to grow and beautiful, with the added benefit that pollinators love them! Just be careful to trim them — lilac can grow more than 10 feet tall and block the sunlight you want to get to your blueberries.

 

Why Plant Lilac with Blueberries

  • Adds color
  • Attracts pollinators

 

7. Hydrangea

These flowers are a great companion to blueberries and can ensure that the beauty in your garden lives on after your blueberry patch has gone dormant.

Hydrangeas add a pop of color to your garden and attract pollinators your blueberries need, especially when they go dormant
Hydrangeas add a pop of color to your garden and attract pollinators your blueberries need, especially when they go dormant

Hydrangeas bloom as blueberries go out of season. These flowers don’t need as much sun as blueberries. Plant them in a shadier section.

 

Why Plant Hydrangea with Blueberries

  • Adds color
  • Attracts pollinators

 

8. Sage

This lovely-smelling herb sage is very versatile and hardy. It will grow in acidic as well as alkaline soil. It grows well alongside blueberries.

Sage can grow in both alkaline and acidic soil, as well as repel pests that feed on blueberries
Sage can grow in both alkaline and acidic soil, as well as repel pests that feed on blueberries

Some of the best pollinators love sage, while some of the worst pests for blueberries, including black flea beetles, hate it. You can burn sage in your home for a pleasant smell that some say cleanses the air of pollen and mold spores.

 

Why Plant Sage with Blueberries

  • Great pollinator
  • Grows in various soil types

 

9. Comfrey

This beautiful and beneficial flower is an excellent companion to blueberry bushes because it contributes vital nitrogen to the soil through its roots.

Comfrey is one of the best blueberry companion plants as it helps contribute nitrogen to the soil
Comfrey is one of the best blueberry companion plants as it helps contribute nitrogen to the soil

Comfrey can spread quickly and compete with other plants for resources.

 

Why Plant Comfrey with Blueberries

  • Adds nitrogen to the soil

 

10. Dill

This herb is perfect for your blueberry garden. It is a delicious fresh flavor that you can add to your cooking.

It also attracts insects like ladybugs and protects blueberries by preying on pests. Aphids hate dill.

Aside from not being water-hungry, dill is one of the bluberry's best companion plant as it attracts beneficial insects that prey on pests like aphids
Aside from not being water-hungry, dill is one of the bluberry’s best companion plant as it attracts beneficial insects that prey on pests like aphids

Additionally, it is drought resistant and doesn’t need much water, so you can trust it not to make your blueberries thirsty.

 

Why Plant Dill with Blueberries

  • Attracts beneficial insects
  • Repels plant pests
  • It does not need much water

 

11. Parsley

Acidic soil is no problem for parsley, which grows easily in the conditions best for blueberries. It’s a great garnish and a perfect companion plant.

Parsley and blueberries make great companion plants as they both love acidic soil
Parsley and blueberries make great companion plants as they both love acidic soil

When you have so many flowers, it’s nice to add a bit of extra ground-level greenery.

 

Why Plant Parsley with Blueberries

  • Tolerate acidic soil
  • Adds greenery to the patch

 

12. Oak Trees

If you have a small garden, you are probably not thinking about planting oak trees alongside your blueberry patch. However, these can support blueberry bushes if you have the room (or some pre-existing oak trees to plant around).

Aside from temperate-climate loving plants, oak trees also retain moisture and provide mulch for the blueberries
Aside from temperate-climate-loving plants, oak trees also retain moisture and provide mulch for the blueberries

Blueberries and oak trees both like temperate climates and acidic soil. The root network that large oat trees establish retains water, providing more moisture for them to draw on, and falling leaves act as mulch and fertilizer.

 

Why Plant Oak Trees with Blueberries

  • Also prefers temperate climates
  • Retains water in the soil
  • Provides mulch from falling leaves

 

13. Pine Trees

Blueberries can be a great understory crop for pine trees, which love the same kind of acidic soil and can help prevent pests. Falling pine needles can make a kind of protective mulch that inhibits weeds.

Though pine trees love the acidic soil and can repel pests that prey on blueberries, make sure they don't overshadow the blueberries
Though pine trees love the acidic soil and can repel pests that prey on blueberries, make sure they don’t overshadow the blueberries

However, blueberries require a lot of light, so ensure they have enough space so they don’t get completely overshadowed.

 

Why Plant Pine Trees with Blueberries

  • Love acidic soil
  • Prevents pests

 

14. Holly

As an evergreen shrub, holly is a great addition to gardens in temperate climates. They flower during the winter when blueberries are dormant.

Holly benefits from acidic soil with plenty of moisture. Holly berries are toxic and inedible for both people and pets.

Like hydrangeas, holly also bloom when the blueberries go dormant. But, unlike the blueberries, they're inedible to both human and pets as they're toxic
Like hydrangeas, holly also bloom when the blueberries go dormant. But, unlike the blueberries, they’re inedible to both human and pets as they’re toxic

 

Why Plant Holly with Blueberries

  • Repels insects
  • Flower in winter when blueberries are dormant

 

15. Mountain Laurel

The beautiful flowers of these resilient and beginner-friendly shrubs look great with blueberry bushes and enjoy the same conditions.

Mountain Laurel thrive with blueberries in the same conditions, as well as look great when planted alongside each other
Mountain Laurel thrive with blueberries in the same conditions, as well as look great when planted alongside each other

For aesthetic reasons alone, consider planting some mountain laurel alongside blueberry bushes in your garden.

 

Why Plant Mountain Laurel with Blueberries

  • Easy to care for
  • Thrive in similar conditions to blueberries
  • Look great alongside blueberry bushes

 

Planting Blueberries

Blueberries need full sun to grow. They thrive in acid soil with a ph of 4.5. The soil needs to be well-draining and high in organic matter.

Peat, pine, bark sand, and peat moss are great soil additions. Fertilize monthly using an acid-forming fertilizer that blueberries like.

Rhododendron or Azalea mixes with an NPK of 20-10-20 are best. Blueberries are light feeders.

Plant blueberries in containers or in high ground. They are sensitive to frost, according to Tennessee State University.

Water until they are fully saturated.

 

Blueberry Plant Varieties

Popular blueberry cultivars for gardeners are:

  • Northern and southern highbush blueberry hybrids: This berry is available in the US as a cultivar name “Legacy.” Grows 6-7 feet tall (1.80-2.10m).
  • Rabbiteye blueberries: Native to the Southeastern US.Grows up to 9 feet (2.7m)
  • Lowbush blueberry: Native in Maine and Canada. Grows only 1 foot tall (30cm). Berry yield is low.

 

Benefits of Growing Companion Plants with Blueberry

The benefits of growing other plants around blueberry plants:

  • Group plants with similar soil needs
  • You can add plants that add soil nutrients
  • Some plants will cover the ground and protect blueberries
  • Add plants to attract pollinators
  • A plant that repels insects makes a good companion plant

Cornell University recommends planting cover crops. They help to increase organic matter and improve the soil structure. They also prevent weeds from growing.

Popular cover crops include Buckwheat, Annual Field Brome, Marigolds, and grasses such as Ryegrass.

Some of the popular cover crops are Buckwheat, Marigolds, and Ryegrass
Some of the popular cover crops are Buckwheat, Marigolds, and Ryegrass

 

What to Avoid When Growing Plants with Blueberries

Avoid planting plants near your blueberry that will compete for space. Ensure ample space around the blueberry plant.

Good companion plants to grow with these high berries are plants with similar soil and temperature needs.

This is also why you should not grow raspberries and blueberries together. They require different soil acidity.

Raspberries and blueberries shouldn't be planted together as they need different soil acidity
Raspberries and blueberries shouldn’t be planted together as they need different soil acidity

Avoid plants that deprive the soil of nutrients such as micronutrients, Nitrogen, Potassium, and Phosphorus (NPK). Berry plants are nutrient-hungry.

 

Avoid these Plants Near Blueberries

Some plants don’t make great blueberry companion plants. The reason is that they either prefer nonalkaline soils or lots of nutrients. Or both.

A list of plants you should not be growing with blueberries are:

  • Kale
  • Tomatoes
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Melons
  • Beans
  • Cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cauliflowers
  • Peppers

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Blueberry Companion Plants

 

Where Should Your Blueberry Bushes Best Be Planted?

You need a location with plenty of direct sunlight, loose, acidic soil with good drainage, and cleared of weeds and invasive plants. You might also consider selecting a spot next to pine trees or oak trees, which can protect them and provide other benefits.

 

What Should Not Be Planted Near Blueberries?

Any plant that requires alkaline soil will not grow well with blueberries. Leave space between blueberries and other nutrient-hungry plants, like strawberries, nightshades (like tomatoes), melons, beans, peas, or greens.


 

Growing Companions for Blueberries

You can protect and encourage blueberries by selecting plants that attract pollinators. Some plants attract beneficial insects. And some companion plants repel pests or protect blueberries. The best companion plants include borage, thyme, strawberry, rhododendron, fern, lilac, hydrangea, sage, comfrey, dill, parsley, oak, pine trees, holly, and mountain laurel.

Author Bio

Daniel Iseli

Taking care of houseplants and gardening are my greatest passions. I am transforming my apartment into an urban jungle and am growing veggies in my indoor and outdoor garden year-round.