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Root Roses from a Bouquet in Water  — My Best Tips

Root Roses from a Bouquet in Water  — My Best Tips

How to root roses from a bouquet in water? You’ll read in this article my experience growing roses from cut flowers.

Roses are some of the most romantic and beautiful flowers out there. According to Arizona University, some popular cultivars are Hybrid tea, Floribundas Polyanthas, and Grandifloras.

It’s hard not to want to let those flowers live on and flourish rather than wilt and die.

Luckily, it’s pretty easy to give your roses a second shot at life by allowing them to grow new roots. You can either propagate roses in water or use a rooting medium.

You can even grow a rose bush by inserting a stem into a potato.

 

How to Root Roses from a Bouquet in Water?

Place your cut roses in a jar with 2-3 inches of fresh water at the bottom. Place a plastic bag over the top. Leave them there, replacing the water every day. White roots emerge from where the rose was cut in about a month. You can apply rooting hormone to the cut to encourage root growth.

Root Roses from a Bouquet in Water
Root Roses from a Bouquet in Water

 

Propagate Cut Flower Stems in Winter

Roses are easy to propagate, and once they are transplanted, a rose plant grown from a cutting will have all of the characteristics of the parent plant, producing the same beautiful and fragrant flowers.

Roses grown from cuttings will have all the parent plant's characteristics, as well as produce the same fragrant and beautiful flowers
Roses grown from cuttings will have all the parent plant’s characteristics, as well as produce the same fragrant and beautiful flowers

Although it’s very easy to get started growing roses from cuttings, there are still plenty of things that could go wrong.

You can improve your odds of growing a healthy new rose bush by following simple steps to protect your cuttings from mold and give them access to everything they need to produce a new root system.

 

Step-By-Step Instructions to Propagate Rose Cuttings in Water

1. First, remove the rose flowers from the vase you keep, clean it, and refill it with 2 to 3 inches of water.

2. Cut the stem at a 45-degree angle, even if it has already been cut. On the cut part, apply the rooting hormone if you are using it.

Even if you have already cut the rose, cut its stem at a 45-degree angle and apply rooting hormone to the cut end
Even if you have already cut the rose, cut its stem at a 45-degree angle and apply rooting hormone to the cut end

3. Remove the flower buds, rose flowers, and the bottom 2-3 leaves. Ensure a set of leaves (2-3)remains on the plant.

Remove rose buds, flowers, and the bottom 2-3 leaves of the rose cutting. But, make sure to leave at least 2-3 leaves on the plant
Remove rose buds, flowers, and the rose cutting’s bottom 2-3 leaves. But make sure to leave at least 2-3 leaves on the plant.

4. Gently add the cutting to the container, and replace the water daily. Try to use room temperature and keep the water level similar to reduce the shock to the plant.

5. Place a plastic bag over the top of the container. This will hold in moisture and gases that will encourage the rooting process. Keep the cutting away from direct sunlight.

Just like how the plastic bottle is placed over this rose cutting, cover your rose cuttings in water with plastic bag to hold gases and moisture that'll help speed the rooting process
Just like how the plastic bottle is placed over this rose cutting, cover your rose cuttings in water with a plastic bag to hold gases and moisture that’ll help speed the rooting process.

6. Wait anywhere from a week to 6 weeks to see roots. You will start to see new growth. Tiny white nodules emerge from where the rose was cut that grow into roots.

7. When the roots are beginning to get longer, add more soil to the water each time you refill it until your container is filled with damp soil rather than water.

8. You are ready to transplant your cutting into its new home — a pot where it will sit in indirect sunlight.

 

Propagate Rose Cuttings Using Potatoes

Rose propagation can also be done by putting cut stems in a potato. For this, make a hole in a potato. Take rose cuttings with at least three nodes. Insert the cut stems into the potato.

Plant the potato into potting soil. It should be planted about 4 inches deep (10cm). To increase humidity, you can create a humidity dome using a cut bottle or plastic bag to cover it.

 

Putting Rooted Rose Cuttings in Potting Soil

Once you have rooted cuttings, you can put them into the soil. Get good-quality potting soil or root stem cuttings directly into the ground.

Place the cuttings 4 inches (10cm) into the soil in the hole you created. With your hand, gently push the soil against the stem’s bottom.

Once the cuttings are planted, water them well around the stem.

Water the rose cuttings around the stem after planting them in the soil
Water the rose cuttings around the stem after planting them in the soil

Alternatively, you can dip cuttings into rooting hormone again before planting them into the soil. You know you have a healthy developing rose when you see leaves grow.

The growth of new leaves is a sign that your rose cuttings are developing healthily
The growth of new leaves is a sign that your rose cuttings are developing healthily

 

Is it Difficult to Root Roses Cuttings from a Bouquet?

Roses are often associated with delicacy and fragility, but they are strong plants ready to grow.

Even flowers you get from a florist can grow into new rose plants with all the same great characteristics as the parent plant. You can even cut a single rose into several pieces to grow each one into its own plant!

But, there are limits to the mighty rose’s strength. Any time a plant, in this case, a rose is cut, there is a risk of infection and rot. If a rose from a bouquet gets moldy or infected, it isn’t in much of a position to put up a fight.

It doesn’t have a network of roots to draw strength and nutrients from.

It’s not difficult to grow roses from cuttings, but it requires some care and attention.

 

Keep Rose Stem Cuttings Clean and Healthy

The most important thing when getting a rose to grow new roots is to protect it and give it the right conditions to grow safely.

As long as it gets indirect sunlight and the water it sits in is clean and fresh, it should be able to use its remaining strength to grow its roots to survive and thrive.

You must be vigilant because your roses need their water changed daily or every three days. If you forget to tend to your rose cuttings for a week, they will likely start rotting or developing mold.

You can make it easier by relabeling the container every time you replace the water, reminding yourself of when you did it last or setting a daily alarm to remind yourself to replace the water and check on the roots.

 

Growing Roses from Cut Flowers using Rooting Hormone

You don’t need to use a rooting hormone. But many gardeners do. It decreases the time it takes for a cutting to grow roots, reducing the risk of failure.

Using these chemicals is optional but helpful. Some holistic gardeners swear by natural alternatives, including willow and cinnamon.

Willow and cinnamon are known natural alternatives to synthetic rooting hormone powder
Willow and cinnamon are known natural alternatives to synthetic rooting hormone powder

If you use a rooting hormone, apply it to the plant cuttings directly. Inserting the stem into the rooting hormone can transmit diseases from cutting to cutting.

 

The Best Time for Rose Plant Propagation

Propagate roses in spring and summer. Cuttings develop best during the main growing phase for plants.

They will grow and also root best during the growing season. But you can try to root Roses any time of the year.

 

Best Tips for Propagating Roses

  • Take your cuttings in spring and summer
  • Use green stems instead of brown woody stems
  • Use rooting hormone
  • When rotting in water, change the water frequently
  • Root rose cuttings in water to watch your cuttings grow

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Rooting Roses from a Bouquet in Water

 

How Long Do Roses Take to Root in Water?

It usually takes anywhere from 1 week to more than a month for roses to grow roots in water. Using a rooting hormone can lessen the time. Most often, the first positive signs that the cutting is developing roots are not the roots but tender new leaves that begin to grow towards the light.

 

Can I Replant Flowers From a Bouquet?

You can, but you need to root them first! You can give new life to that bouquet of roses, but you’ll need to spend a month or so taking care of the cuttings and allowing them to grow roots before you re-pot them.


 

Growing Roses From Cuttings

First, place the cut roses in a clean container and fill it with 2 to 3 inches of fresh water. Cover the container with a plastic bag, and replace the water daily.

If you take good care of your rose cuttings and don’t forget about them (allowing mold and infection), they will begin to grow new roots in about a month.

Author Bio

Daniel Iseli

Taking care of houseplants and gardening are my greatest passions. I am transforming my apartment into an urban jungle and am growing veggies in my indoor and outdoor garden year-round.