Skip to Content

30 Best Plants for A Vegetable Garden — Top Veggies in 2022

When it comes to vegetables, growing them through seeds is probably the easiest and most economical way to produce them. Within no time and little effort, you can soon have a vegetable garden of your own.

According to the location of your garden and the amount of sunlight it gets every day, you can conveniently come up with a list of plants that you can grow in your garden.

While some vegetables do need a good amount of sunlight before they are ready to be harvested, others don’t need it much and will do well, even in full shade.

While starting your vegetable garden with a transplant is more accessible, we recommend walking the extra mile and planting them with the help of seeds instead.

Firstly, they are way cheaper than any transplanted plant you will find in a nursery. You will get thousands of seeds in the same money you would pay for a single potted plant.

Secondly, seeds offer much more variety than transplanted plants ever will. You can find seeds for almost every color of every plant, but that won’t be true if you want to use a plant that is already potted.

Lastly, when you plant with seeds, the likelihood of the plant surviving is very high.

There are many plants that will not do well once they are transplanted into another pot, their growth will be stunted, and they will die soon.

Here are 30 such plants you can grow conveniently to start your own vegetable garden.

Make sure you water it enough in the initial phase of its development, and it will do wonders for you.

30 Best Plants for A Vegetable Garden

  1. Arugula (Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa)
  2. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)
  3. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa)
  4. Peas (Pisum sativum)
  5. Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)
  6. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea)
  7. Beets (Beta vulgaris)
  8. Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo)
  9. Radish (Raphanus sativus)
  10. Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica)
  11. Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris)
  12. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)
  13. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)
  14. Carrots (Daucus Carota)
  15. Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)
  16. Onions and Shallots (allium cepa)
  17. Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa)
  18. Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum)
  19. Radishes (Raphanus sativus)
  20. Rutabaga (Brassica napus)
  21. Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas)
  22. Turnips (Brassica rapa)
  23. Bok Choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis)
  24. Brocolli (Brassica Oleracea)
  25. Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea)
  26. Kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala)
  27. Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum)
  28. Collards (Brassica oleracea var. viridis)
  29. Corn Salad (Valerianella locusta)
  30. Dill (Anethum graveolens)
30 Best Plants for A Vegetable Garden

30 Best Plants for A Vegetable Garden

 

 

Best Plants for A Vegetable Garden – 30 Best Choices

 

1. Arugula (Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa)

Arugula (Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa) is one of the dishes that you grow in your vegetable garden

Arugula (Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa) is one of the dishes that you grow in your vegetable garden

Arugula is a very healthy vegetable with a longish inflorescence according to the University of Berkeley that gives a distinct taste and spice to your salad, pasta seasonings, and much more.

It is a cool-season green vegetable that you can sow directly in the season of spring or fall.

Once the leaves are about two to three inches long, start cutting them regularly so as to maintain the shape and prevent infections.

 

2. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is one of the best plants to grow in a vegetable garden as they're easy to grow

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is one of the best plants to grow in a vegetable garden as they’re easy to grow

Asparagus, being a perennial vegetable, is very easy to plant. All you have to do is plant it once with the help of seeds or simply use a transplant, and then just wait for the magic to happen.

The first shoots will begin to appear when the temperature reaches around 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius).

Make sure that you give this plant enough space to grow because, with time, it will begin to spread over the entire area, and you do not want to destroy the healthy plant.

This plant needs loamy soil, and the USDA growing zones are 3 to 10, which makes it a pretty convenient plant to have in your vegetable garden.

 

3. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa)

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is another plant that's best to grow in a vegetable garden

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is another plant that’s best to grow in a vegetable garden

The best time to grow lettuce is the cool and wet season of spring. You can choose from various lettuce varieties to plant, based on where you live.

If you live in an icy region of the country, Romaine or Butterhead are some of the best options for you as they are incredibly cold-tolerant.

To plant lettuce, you should have the availability of rich and organic soil mixed with peat moss. The USDA growing zones for this plant are 2 to 11.

 

4. Peas (Pisum sativum)

Peas (Pisum sativum) is another common plant that you can grow in your vegetable garden

Peas (Pisum sativum) is another common plant that you can grow in your vegetable garden

Peas are very common for being planted on St. Patricks Day. However, some people may not be able to plant it because, at that time, snow is probably covering the entirety of their gardens.

The best time to plant peas is the month of March and April. It does have a wide range of temperatures in which you can grow peas; the USDA growing zones are 2 to 11.

The soil that’s best for this plant is well-drained and rich in organic matter.

 

5. Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) is one of the plants you can grow on a vegetable garden that you can reap for years

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) is one of the plants you can grow on a vegetable garden that you can reap for years

Rhubard is one of those plants that you have to plant once and then reap its benefits for years.

Once you make all your effort to establish the bed for its plantation, you can have freshly produced rhubarb at your ease for the next decade.

Rhubard needs rich, organic soil so that it can last for a long time. Its USDA growing zones are 3 to 8, and it can survive in full to partial shade.

 

6. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea)

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is one of the plants you can grow in a vegetable garden when you want to make salads, smoothies, and pastas

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is one of the plants you can grow in a vegetable garden when you want to make salads, smoothies, and pastas

Spinach is known for its excellent use in salads, pasta, and smoothies. It has iron and magnesium in abundance, which simply adds to its nutritional value.

Once you plant it, you will not have to wait for months before it finally grows. It grows rapidly, and you don’t need to do much other than watering it every once in a while.

The pH of your planting soil should be neutral, and the soil should be fertile so that the vegetable does not quickly bolt.

The USDA growing zones for this vegetable are 2 to 11.

 

7. Beets (Beta vulgaris)

Beets (Beta vulgaris) is a low-maintenance plant that you can grow in a vegetable garden

Beets (Beta vulgaris) is a low-maintenance plant that you can grow in a vegetable garden

Beets are low-maintenance vegetables because they are not highly intolerant to snow and can survive repeated light frosts. Moreover, it takes about seven to ten weeks to mature after you have planted it.

To aid this plant to thrive, give them space. Beets love to have their own space to grow at their optimum rate.

Not cluttering these plants together will also ensure the proper air circulation for them.

Soil should be loamy, light, and well-drained. The USDA growing zones are 2 to 11.

 

8. Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo)

You can plant Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) in your vegetable garden after the last frost has passed

You can plant Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) in your vegetable garden after the last frost has passed

You can plant zucchini after the last frost has passed, after which they will germinate in about ten days.

Although zucchini is very easy to grow and maintain, it can be affected by a number of plant diseases and lead to wilting if proper care is not provided.

The most common disease for zucchini is powdery mildew, but it can be treated in a few days if it is caught in the earlier stages.

 

9. Radish (Raphanus sativus)

Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a great plant to grow in your vegetable garden if you're aiming to have a veggie that has a peppery taste

Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a great plant to grow in your vegetable garden if you’re aiming to have a veggie that has a peppery taste

Radish greens are edible, and they provide a slight peppery flavor to salads and sandwiches. Ensure that you give them proper moisture; otherwise, the plant tends to become very hard and fibrous.

You can plant radishes in a container or a garden according to your availability.

 

10. Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica)

Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) is another easy plant to grow in the cold season in your vegetable garden

Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) is another easy plant to grow in the cold season in your vegetable garden

Growing Kale is very easy in the cold season. After establishing the bed for the growth of Kale, you can rely on it to grow itself naturally.

Once in a while, water it and look for signs of white patches or discoloration of leaves.

While the small and young leaves of Kale taste incredible when eaten raw in salads, you can also cook the mature leaves just like spinach to soften the leaves a bit.

 

11. Swiss Chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris)

Swiss Chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) is another great plant to grow in your vegetable garden

Swiss Chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) is another great plant to grow in your vegetable garden

There are a lot of varieties you can choose from when it comes to planting swiss chard in your vegetable garden.

Bright light is one such variety that you’d be more than happy to grow in your garden.

You can either cook swiss chard like spinach or simply eat it raw in salads. As for the stalk, swiss chard is commonly used as a substitute for celery stalk as it has the same flavor and appearance with the latter.

To have swiss chard in your garden all year long, you should fertilize it with fish emulsion once in two weeks or three weeks.

 

12. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

The best time to plant Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in your vegetable garden is when the soil has warmed up a little after the last frost

The best time to plant Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in your vegetable garden is when the soil has warmed up a little after the last frost

The common options that you have while planting beans are either pole beans or bush beans. The right time to plant bean seeds is right after the soil has warmed a little after the frost season.

While pole beans should be grown at least six inches apart, bush beans will do with three to four inches of distancing.

You may need a trellis to prevent the beans from spreading here and there erratically.

Harvest them when the beans are still considerably thin and have not too become thick.

 

13. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

There are various Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) varieties that you can plant in your vegetable garden

There are various Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) varieties that you can plant in your vegetable garden

With cucumbers, you also have a lot of options. You can go ahead with vining types, for which you will eventually need a trellis to support the vines.

Moreover, you can choose bush, slicers, or pickling cucumbers. For a well-developed fruit, make sure to keep the plant moist and not let it dry out.

If the plant dries out in the critical period of harvesting, you will eventually end up with a hard and bitter fruit.

 

14. Carrots (Daucus Carota)

Carrots (Daucus Carota) can be quite a tricky plant to grow in your vegetable garden

Carrots (Daucus Carota) can be quite a tricky plant to grow in your vegetable garden

Carrot is quite a tricky and challenging vegetable to grow in your garden. The expensive long and thin carrots you see in the supermarket are tough to plant in particular because they take months to mature.

While they are developing at their own pace, the insects that are embedded in the soil will start to eat your lovely carrots from the bottom.

For this reason, it is recommended to start growing relatively more straightforward species of carrots such as Paris Market or Little Finger. They have a crunchy texture, and they mature way faster than the latter.

Carrots usually need well-drained and loose soil so that they can spread roots under the plant quickly. The USDA growing zone for carrots is 2 to 11.

 

15. Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)

If you're planning to plant Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) in your vegetable garden, it's better to do so in a planting pot

If you’re planning to plant Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) in your vegetable garden, it’s better to do so in a planting pot

It is better to grow horseradish in a planting pot and treat it as an annual plant because if you do it otherwise, there is a strong likelihood that you will not be able to get rid of this plant at your whim.

Even if you leave a little root inside the soil, you will soon find that the ground is spreading with another unexpected horseradish harvest.

 

16. Onions and Shallots (allium cepa)

Onions and Shallots (allium cepa) are great plant additions to your vegetable garden

Onions and Shallots (allium cepa) are great plant additions to your vegetable garden

If you want to grow onions, you will have to walk the extra mile to have fruitful results. To plant onions, you have three options.

Firstly, you can simply use a transplant and put it in your garden; this is the easiest method so far. Secondly, you can do it with seeds, which will be a bit tricky.

Thirdly, you can use tiny onion bulbs and place them in rich organic soil for further growth in your garden.

While onions are very adaptable to changes in temperature, the best USDA zone for their growth are 5 and 6.

The pH of the soil is acidic, and the nature of the ground should be loamy or heavy clay.

 

17. Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa)

Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa) is one great plant to grow in your vegetable garden as they can thrive in any USDA zone

Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa) is one great plant to grow in your vegetable garden as they can thrive in any USDA zone

The best part about growing parsnips is that you can grow them in absolutely any USDA zone.

While they are often confused with carrots or radishes, they have a very distinct flavor, making it worth the plantation and the wait.

You can eat parsnips in various ways, according to your liking. You can either clean them properly and have them raw, boil them, sprinkle some sea salt, mash it, or sautee it to light brown.

An ideal soil for parsnips is loose and acidic soil rich in organic matter.

 

18. Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), though a stem tuber, is a plant that's grown in a vegetable garden as a root crop

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), though a stem tuber, is a plant that’s grown in a vegetable garden as a root crop

While potato is a stem tuber and not actually a root crop, it is grown like one. They’re an everyday staple that you can have in your diet in various methods.

The simplest is to roast them and sprinkle some seasoning, but you can also use other methods such as boiling, frying, or steaming.

The USDA growing zones for Solanum tuberosum are 2 to 11, and they thrive in full sunlight, which ranges from about six to ten hours of daylight every day.

 

19. Radishes (Raphanus sativus)

Radishes (Raphanus sativus) are best planted in a vegetable garden after the last frost when the soil's warm

Radishes (Raphanus sativus) are best planted in a vegetable garden after the last frost when the soil’s warm

The best time to plant radishes is when your soil is warming up a little bit after the frost season has passed.

Since radishes are very much vulnerable to bolting and in cooler temperatures, plant your radishes as soon as your soil is set.

There is a variety of radishes that you can consider planting, which includes spicy radishes, winter radishes, or silver-thin radishes.

 

20. Rutabaga (Brassica napus)

Rutabaga (Brassica napus) is another easy-to-grow plant in your vegetable garden

Rutabaga (Brassica napus) is another easy-to-grow plant in your vegetable garden

Rutabagas are very easy to grow in a vegetable garden as they do not need a lot of space, water, or fertilizer.

This vegetable has a crispy texture; however, it is reduced to half its weight and becomes incredibly buttery when cooked.

They are ideal to be used for pie because of this buttery luscious texture that they give when cooked.

These plants need a maturation period of about 90 days or even more, so make sure you give it that time before it is ready to be harvested.

It requires well-draining and slightly acidic soil that is free of excess water. Otherwise, this will rot the roots and eventually inhibit the growth of rutabagas.

 

21. Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas)

When you want to plant Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) in your vegetable garden, grow them indoors first until they can adapt to the temperature outside

When you want to plant Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) in your vegetable garden, grow them indoors first until they can adapt to the temperature outside

The best thing you can do for growing sweet potatoes is to plant them in a container box and keep them indoors for a while until the soil begins to warm.

Because they need a growing period of at least four months and they do not do well in colder temperatures, the right thing to do is keep them indoors until they are adaptable to the temperature outside.

Sweet potatoes are grown with small rooted pieces of the tubers that grow ideally in the USDA growing zones of 8 to 11.

It survives in full to partial shade and needs well-drained and rich soil.

 

22. Turnips (Brassica rapa)

Turnips (Brassica rapa) is another great plant to grow in your vegetable garden as you can eat both the greens and the roots

Turnips (Brassica rapa) is another great plant to grow in your vegetable garden as you can eat both the greens and the roots

Turnips come in different forms and sizes; there are white turnips with purple tops and golden and bright red. Also, you can eat both the roots as well as the greens.

While the greens do well in salads and pasta, you can use the root tuber for numerous fillings in pies and cakes.

They are very easy to grow because they can grow in any USDA zone and do not take much time to mature.

 

23. Bok Choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis)

Bok Choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is one of the plants you can grow in your vegetable garden that grows 8-9 inches in 40 days

Bok Choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is one of the plants you can grow in your vegetable garden that grows 8-9 inches in 40 days

Bok Choy grows very quickly, reaching about eight to nine inches long in only forty days. They are heat tolerant, so you don’t have to worry about the temperature conditions when growing this vegetable.

However, do look out for insects as the root of this plant is vulnerable to attacks by many bugs that will eventually rot the entire plant.

 

24. Brocolli (Brassica Oleracea)

If you want to plant Brocolli (Brassica Oleracea) in your vegetable garden, do so before the fall season

If you want to plant Brocolli (Brassica Oleracea) in your vegetable garden, do so before the fall season

Brocolli is an excellent vegetable for roasting, salads, and more. You can easily plant them in your vegetable garden by planting them about four to five months before fall so that it has enough time for maturation.

Brocolli is vulnerable to getting attacked by pests. Therefore, it is the best practice to spray them lighting with a mild pesticide that protects it from pests and does not destroy the healthy florets.

The ideal USDA growing zones for broccoli are 3 to 10, and they can survive in full sun to partial shade.

However, if kept in complete shade for a long time, the growth of the vegetable may become stunted.

 

25. Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea)

Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea) is best planted in your vegetable garden during the summer season

Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea) is best planted in your vegetable garden during the summer season

The proper season for planting this green vegetable is the season of summer.

Needing around three to four months to mature and produce a large head, you should plant your seeds around mid-summer to have the cabbage ready by fall.

You should have a well-drained and rich soil to grow cabbage mixed with peat moss or other organic components.

It thrives in full sun to partial shade, and the ideal USDA growing zone for brassica oleracea is 1 to 9.

 

26. Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea)

When you're planting Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) in your vegetable garden, make sure to have lots of patience as it is a slow-grower

When you’re planting Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) in your vegetable garden, make sure to have lots of patience as it is a slow-grower

While growing cauliflower, keep in mind that it is an extremely slow grower and takes a lot of time for maturation.

Therefore, if you want to harvest your cauliflower in mid-fall, you should be planting it about four to five months earlier.

Pluck the heads from the plant when they have reached a desirable size, and their buds are still tight.

The optimum growing zones for cauliflower are 2 to 11, and it thrives in full sun.

 

27. Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum)

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) grows best when you plant it in a vegetable garden with a slightly acidic soil

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) grows best when you plant it in a vegetable garden with a slightly acidic soil

To grow cilantro, you should have slightly acidic soil that is well-drained and moist. Moreover, make sure you provide cilantro with full to partial sun and give it about two to three months to mature.

In many cases, it grows up to one to two feet tall.

 

28. Collards (Brassica oleracea var. viridis)

You can harvest Collards (Brassica oleracea var. viridis) after 8 to 90 days after you plant it in your vegetable garden

You can harvest Collards (Brassica oleracea var. viridis) after 8 to 90 days after you plant it in your vegetable garden

The ideal growing zones for collards are 2 to 11, and they require about eight to ninety days to mature before being ready to harvest.

Collards need well-drained yet moist soil that is rich in organic material.

 

29. Corn Salad (Valerianella locusta)

Corn Salad (Valerianella locusta) thrives best when planted in a vegetable garden that receives partial sunlight

Corn Salad (Valerianella locusta) thrives best when planted in a vegetable garden that receives partial sunlight

In some regions, corn salad, also known as locusta, grows in full to partial sunlight and requires around forty to seventy days to mature.

The correct pH of the soil for optimum growth should be slightly acidic. Moreover, the soil should be loamy and drained of excess water.

 

30. Dill (Anethum graveolens)

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is one of the plants in your vegetable garden that doesn't need too much attention to grow well

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is one of the plants in your vegetable garden that doesn’t need too much attention to grow well

Dill is one of those plants that you will see growing by themselves in a garden, with little to no attention.

All you need to do to encourage the growth of dill in your garden is to keep the soil moist at all times so that it has all the nutrition it requires for its silent yet enormous growth.

The USDA growing zones for dill are 2 to 11, and it thrives in full sun. It grows up to three to five feet tall and usually requires about three months to mature.

Author Bio

Daniel Iseli

Taking care of houseplants and gardening are my greatest passions. I am transforming my apartment into an urban jungle and am growing veggies in my indoor and outdoor garden year-round.